Calendar of Events

Can’t make it live for our Virtual Events?
The day after the event, ticket-holders will receive
a link to the recording, valid for one week.

Celebrating 85 Years as a Museum
1936-2021!

JULY

CHANGE IN MUSEUM OPEN HOURS:
Saturday, July 3: open 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. (due to a private event).
Sunday, July 4 (Independence Day): closed
Saturday, July 10: open 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. (due to a private event).

More Days, More Hours!

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m.
Starting July 8, enjoy our new expanded hours!
Join one of our knowledgeable docents for a guided tour at 12 p.m., or tour the house at your own pace with a self-guided tour from 1 to 5 p.m.
Guided House Tour, 12 p.m. – $20, FREE for Members. Limited capacity; reservations required. Click here for tickets.
Self-Guided Tours, 1 to 5 p.m. – $15, FREE for Members. Reservations not required; click here to pre-book tickets.

Thursdays in July and August, 5 to 8 p.m.
Summer Evenings in the Garden!
The Merchant’s House is OPEN on Thursday evenings until 5 to 8 p.m. Come take a self-guided tour, and enjoy a glass of wine in our 19th century garden in bloom. $15, FREE for Members. Reservations not required; click here to pre-book tickets.

Sunday, July 11 & 25, 12:30 p.m.
In-Person Walking Tour of 19th Century NoHo: A Century of Change
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Scroll down for info. Click here for tickets.

Tuesday, July 13, 5:30 p.m.
New York Adventure Club Presents: Old New York’s Best-Preserved Home
A Virtual Tour with Museum Historian Ann Haddad
Join New York Adventure Club as we step back in time to 1835 to explore Old New York through the eyes of the Tredwell family and their four live-in Irish servants, who resided in the home on East 4th Street for nearly 100 years. $10; click here for tickets.

Old New York’s Best-Preserved Home is a virtual event. Please contact New York Adventure Club with questions about tickets.

Wednesday, July 14, 7 p.m.
An Interior Designer’s Perspective: Life, Customs, and Style in Mid-19th Century New York
A Virtual House Tour via Zoom
The miracle of the Merchant’s House is that it remains intact with the family’s original 19th century furniture, decorative arts, artwork, curtains and other textiles, encapsulating a moment in time. In this immersive video experience, you’ll follow interior designer and MHM volunteer docent Dennis McAvena through a unique portal of New York City’s design history. You’ll tour all five floors of this landmark late-Federal and Greek Revival rowhouse, exploring how the design of the period rooms, from the elegant to the utilitarian, reflected the family’s values and taste, and informed their use. Following the tour, join interior designer and MHM volunteer docent Dennis McAvena for a Q&A.
$10, FREE MHM Members. Click here to purchase tickets.

An Interior Designer’s Perspective is a virtual event. You will receive a confirmation email from Zoom within 15 minutes of placing your order, and a reminder email one hour before the event.

Thursday, July 15, 6 p.m.
Book Talk: Amy Sohn’s “The Man Who Hated Women: Sex, Censorship, and Civil Liberties in the Gilded Age”
The New York Times–bestselling author Amy Sohn presents a narrative history of Anthony Comstock, anti-vice activist (and U.S. postal inspector), and the remarkable women who opposed his war on women’s rights in the late-19th and early-20th centuries. Without them, there would be no Pill, no Planned Parenthood, and no Roe v. Wade.

Comstock’s eponymous law, passed in 1873, defined contraceptives as obscene and illicit, making it a federal offense to disseminate birth control through the mail or across state lines. Prison sentences were long and fines steep. Between the law’s passage and Comstock’s death in 1915, eight remarkable women were charged with violating state and federal Comstock laws. Amy Sohn will bring these stories to life, including the first woman presidential candidate, Victoria C. Woodhull; birth control activist Margaret Sanger; the anarchist Emma Goldman, and more. Risking imprisonment and death, these women redefined birth control access as a civil liberty.

Amy Sohn, a 1995 graduate of Brown University, is the author of 12 books, which have been published in 11 languages and on 5 continents. She has written weekly columns for the downtown weekly New York Press, the New York Post, and was a contributing editor at New York magazine at for six years. As a freelance journalist she has written for The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, Slate, Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, Men’s Journal, Playboy, and many others. Amy is also a screenplay and television writer, including pilots for HBO, ABC, and Fox.

FREE. Click here to register. Co-hosted by Village Preservation

Book Talk: “The Man Who Hated Women” is a virtual event. Please contact Village Preservation with questions about registration.

Wednesday, July 28, 6 to 7:30 p.m.
What the Architecture of an 1832 Landmark Can Tell Us: An Up-Close and Personal Virtual Tour
What does the design and construction of the Merchant’s House reveal about its residents and the culture and society in which they lived? The floorplans, building materials, and architectural details all provide important clues.

Join board member Anthony Bellov for an extraordinary virtual tour of the home of the Tredwell family and their Irish servants. We’ll explore all five stories, from the steep front stoop (made of glistening white marble, the dominant ornamental stone in the early/mid 19th century) to the crawl-space of the attic (featuring a remnant from the house next door, long since demolished). Every architectural element, large and small, is a piece of the puzzle. Taken together, they represent the values, tastes, and lifestyle of wealthy mid-19th century New Yorkers.

After the tour, Mr. Bellov will be joined for the Q&A by Michael Devonshire, Principal and Director of Conservation, Jan Hird Pokorny Associates. Mr. Devonshire has supervised all restoration projects at the Merchant’s House since 1990. He serves on the New York State Historic Preservation Board and the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.

$10; Free MHM Members. Click here to purchase tickets.

Anthony Bellov: Bachelor’s in Architecture from Pratt Institute, Graduate in Museum Leadership from Bank Street College of Education, long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum and an aficionado in 19th Century American Decorative Arts and Architecture.

The Architecture of an 1832 Landmark is a virtual event. You will receive a confirmation email from Zoom within 15 minutes of placing your order, and a reminder email one hour before the event

 

AUGUST

Tuesday, August 3, 6:30 p.m.
In the Spirit of Science: Researching the Paranormal Using the Scientific Method
August is all about REAL WORLD SCIENCE
A Virtual Event via Zoom
Inexplicable occurrences have been reported at the Merchant’s House since 1933, when the last surviving family member died in the house. In March 2020, when the Museum closed due to COVID-19 and the house was empty of staff and visitors, paranormal investigator Dan Sturges and neuroscientist Dr. Lee began conducting extensive research based on the scientific method, using specialized equipment custom-built for the house.  Through unbiased observation and systematic experimentation, their research is building a better understanding of the strange and fascinating phenomena observed at the Merchant’s House.

REAL WORLD SCIENCE This month, join Dan and Dr. Lee for a backstage discussion about the scientific method in paranormal research – its core foundations and how it’s actually applied in real world experiments to achieve convincing data.

$10, FREE for MHM Members. Click here to purchase tickets

In the Spirit of Science is a virtual event. You will receive a confirmation email from Zoom within 15 minutes of placing your order, and a reminder email one hour before the event.

Thursdays in August, 5 to 8 p.m.
Summer Evenings in the Garden!
The Merchant’s House is OPEN on Thursday evenings until 5 to 8 p.m. Come take a self-guided tour, and enjoy a glass of wine in our 19th century garden in bloom. $15, FREE for Members. Reservations not required; click here to pre-book tickets.

Sunday, August 8 & 22, 12:30 p.m.
In-Person Walking Tour of 19th Century NoHo: A Century of Change
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Scroll down for info. Click here for tickets.

Wednesday, August 11, 6 p.m.
19th Century Summer Pleasures; Water Cures & Flower Pressing
A Virtual Talk with Museum Historian Ann Haddad
Join us as we explore two of the most popular 19th century summer pastimes. First, we’ll head to the grand spa hotels in resort towns upstate to take the “water cure” – the therapeutic use of rich mineral spring water that came into vogue mid-century. Then, we’ll delve into flower pressing, an artistic (hence, “ladylike”) way for 19th century women to pursue their interest in botany and the natural sciences, at a time when those fields were typically closed to women. $10, Free MHM Members. Click here to purchase tickets.

19th Century Summer Pleasures is a virtual event. You will receive a confirmation email from Zoom within 15 minutes of placing your order, and a reminder email one hour before the event.


WALKING TOURS / Second & Fourth Sundays, 12:30 p.m.
In-Person & Socially Distanced

July 11 & 25, August 8 & 22
Walking Tour –
19th Century NoHo: A Century of Change

Join us for a socially distanced journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to wealthy merchant families like the Tredwells. You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Merchant’s House evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial and cultural center during the 19th century.

Stops include Colonnade Row, home to the Astors, Delanos, and Vanderbilts; the Astor Library, now the Public Theater; Tompkins Market, where the Tredwells bought their food; and bustling Astor Place, site of the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal?  You’ll visit 31 Bond Street, where Dr. Harvey Burdell was murdered (and still unsolved!) in 1857, a sure sign of a changing neighborhood.

Walking Tours are in-person events. Tour meets outside the museum and lasts one hour.
Capacity is strictly limited and masks are required for all participants over age 2.
$20; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets. Click here to become a Member.

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Click here for Virtual Exhibitions.

Click here for other Online Offerings.