Calendar of Events

All Virtual Events are recorded
and posted to the Museum’s YouTube page.

Most of our virtual programs are offered free of charge.
Please consider making a donation to support future programming —
and help us fight the proposed development next door!

 

MAY

Sunday, May 12 & 26, 1:30 p.m.
Walking Tour: The Tredwells’ World of 19th Century Noho
(Second & Fourth Sunday of each month)
With the 1825 opening of the Erie Canal, the city’s economy boomed and wealthy merchant families escaped the increasing noise, congestion, and commercialization of the seaport area to move “uptown,” to what is now modern day NoHo, then an exclusive residential enclave. Join us as we explore the Tredwells’ elite neighborhood and discover what life was like for the wealthy merchant class in the mid-19th century. $20; MHM Members Free; purchase Walking Tour tickets.

Walking tours are 90 minutes and meet outside the Merchant’s House.

 

Tuesday, May 21, 5 to 7 p.m.
NoHo Art Night in the Garden
Bring your sketchpad, water colors, or other medium and join artist Sonya Sklaroff in creating in our 19th century garden, or just come by to enjoy a spring evening. This event is part of the NoHo Art Nexus, a month long art exhibition featuring the work of Sonya Sklaroff in 19 NoHo stores.

Sonya Sklaroff has been painting “en plein air” since she was a child. She draws inspiration from the world around her and is particularly interested in patterns of light and shadow and loves to play with perspective and space. For the evening event, Sklaroff will be using special Japanese opaque watercolors and will be painting the beautiful spring blossoming gardens of Merchant’s House in her unique whimsical and colorful style. Bring your drawing materials or watercolors and join her, or sit alongside and enjoy watching her process while taking in the exquisite garden views. Please note that easels are not allowed.

Free; please RSVP to chandler@noho.nyc. Enter the garden via Manuel Plaza at 35 East 4th Street.

About the Artist: Sonya Sklaroff graduated with a BFA from The Rhode Island School of Design and an MFA from Parsons School of Design. Her work is included in international corporate, private, and museum collections. Sklaroff’s studio has been based in NoHo for 25 years. Her current exhibition “NoHo Art Nexus: Outside In” (May 2-28) comprises 76 paintings in 19 businesses throughout her NoHo neighborhood.

 

Opens Wednesday, May 22
Tredwell Costume Collection: Spring & Summer Dress, 1862-1865 (MHM 2002.0840)
This two-piece spring and summer dress, 1862-1865, reflects a transitional style between the 1850s and the 1860s. The invention of synthetic aniline dyes in 1856 made possible the pink color of the fabric, which is printed in an ikat pattern. The use of both aniline dyes and printed (rather than woven) patterns made dresses like this one less expensive, and thus accessible to middle-class women.

 

JUNE

Thursdays in June and July, 5 to 8 p.m.
Summer Evenings in the Garden
Join us for an informal evening to celebrate summer with light refreshments in the garden. Garden admission is free, enter via Manuel Plaza. No reservations.

Live music and guided tours on select evenings at 6 p.m., reservations recommended for house tours.

Thursday, June 6, 6 p.m. – Guided House Tour$20, MHM Members Free; register for 6/6 Guided Tour

Thursday, June 13, 6 p.m. – Guided House Tour $20, MHM Members Free; register for 6/13 Guided Tour

Thursday, June 20, 6 p.m. – Costumed Guided House Tour$25, MHM Members Free; register for 6/20 Costumed Tour
Led by a costumed guide; come in your best 19th century attire (costumes optional)

Thursday, June 27, 6 p.m. – Live Music with Jazz Flutist Cheryl PyleFree, no reservations.

 

Friday, June 7, 1:30 p.m.
Walking Tour: Reinventing the Bond Street Neighborhood, 1865-1900
Created and led by museum docent Michelle Barshay
Join us for a captivating journey to discover the pivotal changes that shaped the “Bond Street area,” once a residential neighborhood for wealthy merchant families like the Tredwells. On this 90-minute tour, we’ll witness the dramatic changes that unfolded as commercial interests began to encroach, compelling these families to move uptown and triggering a metamorphosis of the entire neighborhood. Homes evolved into boarding houses, business establishments, or were demolished. By 1900, the once-fashionable neighborhood was primarily a commercial area, known for printing and manufacturing. Our walking tour will lead you to the majestic landmarks – from the imposing De Vinne Press to the Schermerhorn factory, Robbins & Appleton, and the historic Fire Engine #33. $20; MHM Members Free; purchase Walking Tour tickets.

Walking tours are 90 minutes and meet outside the Merchant’s House.

 

Friday, June 7, 6:30 p.m.
In the Spirit of Science: Can a Building Drive People MAD?
Virtual Program
Dan, Lee, and Matilda are joined by Andrea Janes, co-author of A Haunted History of Invisible Women, to explore whether buildings themselves can drive their inhabitants crazy. Using the particular case of a building in NYC’s West Village, we’ll discuss energy and vibrational patterns (or actual possessions) of structures that might impact the actions and mental states of those who live in them. Free (suggested donation $10); register for “In the Spirit of Science.”

In the Spirit of Science is a monthly video podcast on topics related to ongoing paranormal research at the Merchant’s House. Using the scientific method, with unbiased observation and systematic experimentation, this research is building a better understanding of the strange and fascinating phenomena experienced by staff, volunteers, and visitors at “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times).

The research project and monthly virtual programs are led by neuroscientist Dr. Lee, thanatologist and MHM volunteer Matilda Garrido, and Dan Sturges, founder of Sturges Paranormal, who appears on the Travel Channel’s weekly series, Paranormal Caught on Camera.

 

Sunday, June 9 & 23, 1:30 p.m.
Walking Tour: The Tredwells’ World of 19th Century Noho
(Second & Fourth Sunday of each month)
With the 1825 opening of the Erie Canal, the city’s economy boomed and wealthy merchant families escaped the increasing noise, congestion, and commercialization of the seaport area to move “uptown,” to what is now modern day NoHo, then an exclusive residential enclave. Join us as we explore the Tredwells’ elite neighborhood and discover what life was like for the wealthy merchant class in the mid-19th century. $20; MHM Members Free; purchase Walking Tour tickets.

Walking tours are 90 minutes and meet outside the Merchant’s House.

 

Wednesday, June 12, 6:30 p.m.
An Interior Designer’s Perspective: Life, Customs, and Style in Mid-19th Century New York
A Virtual House Tour
The miracle of the Merchant’s House is that it remains intact with the family’s original 19th century furniture, decorative arts, artwork, curtains and other textiles, encapsulating a moment in time. In this immersive video experience, you’ll follow interior designer and MHM volunteer docent Dennis McAvena through a unique portal of New York City’s design history. You’ll tour all five floors of this landmark late-Federal and Greek Revival rowhouse, exploring how the design of the period rooms, from the elegant to the utilitarian, reflected the family’s values and taste, and informed their use. A Q&A with host Dennis McAvena will follow the tour. Free (suggested donation $10); register for “An Interior Designer’s Perspective.”

 

Special Exhibition opens Thursday, June 13
I ❤ MHM: Fan Art of a National Treasure
The landmark 1832 Merchant’s House is indisputably a National Treasure. It is also much beloved by the many people who have been swept up in its magic over the years. The house has inspired visitors, volunteers, children, and passersby to create artworks in homage since it became a museum in the 1930s. Today, our archive is bursting with photographs, paintings, sculptures, mixed-media, and other artworks.

On display, for the first time, are pieces depicting the late-Federal and Greek Revival facade and selected architectural features by professional and amateur artists. As the Museum fights development next door (and faces possible closure as a result), these works can’t help but serve as a reminder that we must save the Merchant’s House! Included with regular admission.

 

Saturday, June 29, 1:30 p.m.
Neighborhood Walking Tour: Rediscovering 19th-Century Women in the Bond Street Area
Created and led by MHM docent Michelle Barshay
Step into the vibrant world of 19th century NoHo, then known as the “Bond Street Area,” where women from all walks of life made their mark on history. On a captivating 90-minute walking tour through this historic neighborhood, we’ll uncover the fascinating stories of the diverse women who helped shape its character.

Our tour will showcase the rich tapestry of female experiences that once graced these iconic streets: resilient servants, savvy boarding house managers, visionary artists, pioneering publishers, bustling shopkeepers, and society women seeking education. Along the way, we’ll see some important buildings of the period, including the first lending library and the first animal hospital, both founded by visionary women.

Get ready for a journey filled with inspiring tales of the Bond Street Area’s remarkable women! $20; MHM Members Free; purchase Walking Tour tickets.

Walking tours are 90 minutes and meet outside the Merchant’s House.

 

Current Exhibitions

Exhibitions are included with regular museum admission.

Through May 26
Tiny Beautiful Things: Baby and Children’s Clothing from the Tredwell Collection
Seabury and Eliza Tredwell had eight children and six grandchildren. On display, a selection of baby and children’s garments and accessories spanning the 19th century – including dresses, coats, bonnets, gloves, and three never-before-seen embroidered baptismal gowns. During the 19th century, Victorian ideals transformed childhood into a time of innocence, play, and purity, a view often limited, in practice, to middle-and upper-class families. The Tredwell children’s clothing offers a unique window into their lives here at the Merchant’s House.

Opens Wednesday, May 22
Tredwell Costume Collection: Spring & Summer Dress, 1862-1865 (MHM 2002.0840)
This two-piece spring and summer dress, 1862-1865, reflects a transitional style between the 1850s and the 1860s. The invention of synthetic aniline dyes in 1856 made possible the pink color of the fabric, which is printed in an ikat pattern. The use of both aniline dyes and printed (rather than woven) patterns made dresses like this one less expensive, and thus accessible to middle-class women.

Opens Thursday, June 13
I ❤ MHM: Fan Art of a National Treasure
The landmark 1832 Merchant’s House is indisputably a National Treasure. It is also much beloved by the many people who have been swept up in its magic over the years. The house has inspired visitors, volunteers, children, and passersby to create art in homage since it became a museum in the 1930s. Today, our archive is bursting with photographs, paintings, sculptures, mixed-media, and other artworks. On display, for the first time, are pieces depicting the late-Federal and Greek Revival facade and selected architectural features by professional and amateur artists. As the Museum fights development next door (and faces possible closure as a result), these works can’t help but serve as a reminder that we must save the Merchant’s House!

Ongoing
See You at the Ball! Objects from New York’s 1860 Prince of Wales Ball
In October 1860, Albert Edward, the 19-year old Prince of Wales, arrived in New York as part of his four-month tour of North America. The visit was the first of its kind by a British Monarch, and his arrival was eagerly anticipated by New York society. As part of the four-day visit, a grand ball was held in the Prince’s honor at the Academy of Music, just a few blocks from the Tredwells’ home. With thousands in attendance, it was the highlight of the social season. On display, items worn or brought to the ball by Miss Anne Punnett. This collection has recently been donated to the Merchant’s House by an anonymous donor.

 


 

VIRTUAL EXHIBITIONS | ONLINE OFFERINGS