Calendar of Events

Can’t make it live for one of our Virtual Programs?
The day after the event, ticket-holders will receive
a link to the recording, valid for one week.

Masks and proof of vaccination are required for all in-person events.

10 Years Fighting the Proposed Development Next Door, 2012-2022
ALL proceeds go to the Legal Fund!

 

MAY

Open through Sunday, June 18
On Exhibit: Silk Taffeta Dress, ca. 1858 (MHM 2002.0845)
The core of the Tredwell Costume Collection consists of a remarkable 39 dresses documented to have been owned and worn by the women of the family. Many are outstanding examples of the 19th century dressmaker’s art, composed of fine and delicate fabrics and ornamentation.

On display, a two piece green silk taffeta dress, ca.1858, trimmed with black cut silk velvet and featuring decorative cross-lacing (with silk tassels) on the sleeves and the back of the bodice. This dress is documented in the Index of American Design (IAD) at the National Gallery of Art, 1943.8.1472. 

Also on display is a theater handbill from 1860, which was discovered in the early 1960s in the pocket of the dress. The handbill was from Laura Keene’s Theatre, located at 624 Broadway, between Houston and Bleecker Street, just a few blocks from the Tredwell home. Handbills were given out on the street and a popular method for alerting locals to new theater offerings.

 

Sunday, May 8 & 22, 12:30 p.m.
Walking Tour – 19th Century NoHo: A Century of Change
In Person!
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House. You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial and cultural center during the 19th century.
Tours are one hour and begin outside the museum. $20, FREE for Members. Purchase walking tour tickets here. Become a Member here.
Upcoming walking tours: June 12 & 26.

 

Opens Thursday, May 12
Exhibition: “Finest Surviving:” Ornamental Plasterwork at the Merchant’s House Museum
The 1832 Merchant’s House is one of only 120 buildings in New York City distinguished as an exterior – and interior – landmark. Its intact original ornamental plaster work is considered the “finest surviving” from the period. Learn how the plaster walls, ceilings, and ornamentation in the Merchant’s House were created in the 19th century. On display, original 1832 plaster fragments, as well as molds and plaster casts created by sculptor and ornamental plasterer David Flaharty, who used
the same methods as the early 19th century artisans during a house-wide restoration in the 1970s.

This exhibition also commemorates the 10-year anniversary of our fight to protect the house – and in particular, the 1832 plasterwork – from proposed development next door. Included with regular admission.

 

Wednesday, May 18, 6 p.m.
The Merchant’s House Museum – A Tale of Survival (the Merchant’s Misfortune)
A Virtual Talk with Michael Devonshire
The significance of the Merchant’s House to the cultural and architectural history of the city is indisputable. Built in 1832, and now 190 years old, Merchant’s House was the first building in Manhattan designated a NYC landmark in 1965; today, it is also one of only 120 exterior and interior landmarks – and only 6 are residences. It is also a National Historic Landmark and listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Join us as we explore the challenges and triumphs in preserving this unique survivor of Old New York against the unrelenting and unforgiving ravages of time. Michael Devonshire, Director of Conservation at the firm Jan Hird Pokorny Associates, which has overseen all restoration work on the building since 1990, will present a detailed history comprising more than 30 years of conservation projects. From the cobblestone cellar to the slate roof, Mr. Devonshire has been intimately involved with all aspects of the house’s restoration. And as a commissioner at the Landmarks Preservation Commission, he is uniquely qualified to speak to the extraordinary authenticity of the Merchant’s House. FREE; register for Michael Devonshire’s Virtual Talk here.

This event is FREE. Please consider making a donation with your registration.

 

Thursday, May 19, 3:30 p.m. POSTPONED!
Afternoon Tea Talk at the Salmagundi Club: Carl Raymond, in conversation with Esther Crain
An In-Person Talk
Join Carl Raymond, host of The Gilded Gentleman history podcast (and MHM docent), live and in-person for an afternoon of conversation and a proper cup of tea! Carl will be joined by Esther Crain, creator of Ephemeral New York and author of New York City in the Gilded Age 1870-1910 and New York City in 3-D in the Gilded Age. The interview and audience Q&A will be followed by a reception featuring afternoon tea with sweet and savory treats.
Location: Salmagundi Club, 47 Fifth Avenue, New York NY

 

Friday, May 20, 6:30 p.m.
In the Spirit of Science: Researching the Paranormal Using the Scientific Method
Virtual Program
May’s Special Guest – Lisette Coly, President, The Parapsychology Foundation
Dan and Dr. Lee welcome very special guest Lisette Coly, granddaughter of the renowned 20th century medium Eileen Garrett, and president of The Parapsychology Foundation. The Foundation’s extensive library, currently housed in Greenport, NY, is one of the largest repositories of vetted, peer-reviewed parapsychology research in the United States, yet its fate is now uncertain, as the building that houses the library was recently sold.  Dan and Dr. Lee will learn more about this incredible resource, which serves both academic researchers and the general public, and what the future might hold. Lisette will also share memories of her grandmother, whose celebrity clients included Salvadore Dali, Aldous Huxley, and Henry Miller.

“In the Spirit of Science” is an ongoing virtual program in which paranormal investigator Dan Sturges and neuroscientist Dr. Lee discuss their ground-breaking paranormal research, which began in 2020, when the Museum closed due to COVID-19. Through unbiased observation and systematic experimentation, their research is building a better understanding of the strange and fascinating phenomena observed at the Merchant’s House.

Free; register for “In the Spirit of Science” here.

 

JUNE

Thursdays in June, July, and August, until 8 p.m.
Summer Evenings in the Garden
The Museum & Garden are open LATE on Thursday evenings all summer long, with live music and guided tours on select evenings. Included with general admission; no reservations.

June 2, 6 p.m.Live music by jazz flutist Cheryl Pyle
June 9, 6 p.m.Guided house tour
June 16, 6 p.m.Live music by classical vocalist Mina Cuesta. Mina is a student at the Juilliard Extension Program, and currently sings with the Essential Voices Chorus under the direction of Judith Clurman, Manhattan School of Music. She has performed with the New York Pops at Carnegie Hall, and at Opera America.
June 23, 6 p.m.Guided House Tour
June 30, 6 p.m.Guided House Tour

 


Exhibition: “Finest Surviving:” Ornamental Plasterwork at the Merchant’s House Museum
The 1832 Merchant’s House is one of only 120 buildings in New York City distinguished as an exterior – and interior – landmark. Its intact original ornamental plaster work is considered the “finest surviving” from the period. Learn how the plaster walls, ceilings, and ornamentation in the Merchant’s House were created in the 19th century. On display, original 1832 plaster fragments, as well as molds and plaster casts created by sculptor and ornamental plasterer David Flaharty, who used
the same methods as the early 19th century artisans during a house-wide restoration in the 1970s.

This exhibition also commemorates the 10-year anniversary of our fight to protect the house – and in particular, the 1832 plasterwork – from proposed development next door. Included with regular admission.

 

Open through Sunday, June 18
On Exhibit: Silk Taffeta Dress, ca. 1858 (MHM 2002.0845)
The core of the Tredwell Costume Collection consists of a remarkable 39 dresses documented to have been owned and worn by the women of the family. Many are outstanding examples of the 19th century dressmaker’s art, composed of fine and delicate fabrics and ornamentation.

On display, a two piece green silk taffeta dress, ca.1858, trimmed with black cut silk velvet and featuring decorative cross-lacing (with silk tassels) on the sleeves and the back of the bodice. This dress is documented in the Index of American Design (IAD) at the National Gallery of Art, 1943.8.1472. 

Also on display is a theater handbill from 1860, which was discovered in the early 1960s in the pocket of the dress. The handbill was from Laura Keene’s Theatre, located at 624 Broadway, between Houston and Bleecker Street, just a few blocks from the Tredwell home. Handbills were given out on the street and a popular method for alerting locals to new theater offerings.

 

Sunday, June 12 & 26, 12:30 p.m.
Walking Tour – 19th Century NoHo: A Century of Change
In Person!
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House. You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial and cultural center during the 19th century.
Tours are 75 minutes and begin outside the museum. $20, FREE for Members. Purchase walking tour tickets here. Become a Member here.

 

Friday, June 24, 6:30 p.m.
In the Spirit of Science: Researching the Paranormal Using the Scientific Method
Virtual Program
June’s Topic: Covid Closed the Museum – But Was NO ONE There?
Haven’t you always wondered EXACTLY what goes on in the Merchants House when no one is around?  The Covid-19 pandemic provided a perfect opportunity for us to find out, since the house was unoccupied by staff and visitors.  Dr. Lee and paranormal investigator Dan Sturges conducted research and gathered data about potential paranormal activity and are now ready to share their findings.  Dan, Dr. Lee, and Matilda will talk about the evidence collected and what this might mean in terms of the larger ghostly history of the House.  We’ll also review some of the more famous ghost stories reported by our volunteers and visitors, to hopefully begin answering the question … did the Tredwells ever really leave?

“In the Spirit of Science” is an ongoing virtual program in which paranormal investigator Dan Sturges, neuroscientist Dr. Lee, and thanatologist Matilda Garrido discuss Dan & Dr. Lee’s ground-breaking paranormal research, which began in 2020, when the Museum closed due to COVID-19. Through unbiased observation and systematic experimentation, their research is building a better understanding of the strange and fascinating phenomena observed at the Merchant’s House.

Free; register for “In the Spirit of Science” here.

 

JULY

Thursdays in July and August, until 8 p.m.
Summer Evenings in the Garden
The Museum & Garden are open LATE on Thursday evenings all summer long, with live music and guided tours on select evenings. Included with general admission; no reservations.

July 7, 6 p.m.Live music by jazz flutist Cheryl Pyle
July 14, 6 p.m.Guided house tour
July 21, 6 p.m.Live music by classical vocalist Mina Cuesta. Mina is a student at the Juilliard Extension Program, and currently sings with the Essential Voices Chorus under the direction of Judith Clurman, Manhattan School of Music. She has performed with the New York Pops at Carnegie Hall, and at Opera America.
July 28, 6 p.m.Guided House Tour

 

Exhibition: “Finest Surviving:” Ornamental Plasterwork at the Merchant’s House Museum
The 1832 Merchant’s House is one of only 120 buildings in New York City distinguished as an exterior – and interior – landmark. Its intact original ornamental plaster work is considered the “finest surviving” from the period. Learn how the plaster walls, ceilings, and ornamentation in the Merchant’s House were created in the 19th century. On display, original 1832 plaster fragments, as well as molds and plaster casts created by sculptor and ornamental plasterer David Flaharty, who used
the same methods as the early 19th century artisans during a house-wide restoration in the 1970s.

This exhibition also commemorates the 10-year anniversary of our fight to protect the house – and in particular, the 1832 plasterwork – from proposed development next door. Included with regular admission.

 

Sunday, July 10 & 24, 12:30 p.m.
Walking Tour – 19th Century NoHo: A Century of Change
In Person!
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House. You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial and cultural center during the 19th century.
Tours are 75 minutes and begin outside the museum. $20, FREE for Members. Purchase walking tour tickets here. Become a Member here.

 

AUGUST

Thursdays in August, until 8 p.m.
Summer Evenings in the Garden
The Museum & Garden are open LATE on Thursday evenings all summer long, with live music and guided tours on select evenings. Included with general admission; no reservations.

August 4, 6 p.m.Live music by jazz flutist Cheryl Pyle
August 11, 6 p.m.Guided house tour
August 18 6 p.m.Live music by classical vocalist Mina Cuesta. Mina is a student at the Juilliard Extension Program, and currently sings with the Essential Voices Chorus under the direction of Judith Clurman, Manhattan School of Music. She has performed with the New York Pops at Carnegie Hall, and at Opera America.
August 25, 6 p.m.Guided House Tour

Exhibition: “Finest Surviving:” Ornamental Plasterwork at the Merchant’s House Museum
The 1832 Merchant’s House is one of only 120 buildings in New York City distinguished as an exterior – and interior – landmark. Its intact original ornamental plaster work is considered the “finest surviving” from the period. Learn how the plaster walls, ceilings, and ornamentation in the Merchant’s House were created in the 19th century. On display, original 1832 plaster fragments, as well as molds and plaster casts created by sculptor and ornamental plasterer David Flaharty, who used
the same methods as the early 19th century artisans during a house-wide restoration in the 1970s.

This exhibition also commemorates the 10-year anniversary of our fight to protect the house – and in particular, the 1832 plasterwork – from proposed development next door. Included with regular admission.


Sunday, August 14 & 28, 12:30 p.m.

Walking Tour – 19th Century NoHo: A Century of Change
In Person!
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House. You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial and cultural center during the 19th century.
Tours are 75 minutes and begin outside the museum. $20, FREE for Members. Purchase walking tour tickets here. Become a Member here.

 


 

VIRTUAL EXHIBITIONS | ONLINE OFFERINGS

 


 

New York Landmarks Conservancy’s I HEART NY Landmarks Contest
2022 WINNER! “FAVORITE LANDMARK”