Calendar of Events

All Virtual Events are recorded
and posted to the Museum’s YouTube page.

Most of our virtual programs are offered free of charge.
Please consider making a donation to support future programming —
and help us fight the proposed development next door!

FEBRUARY

Through Wednesday, February 21
Love in the Parlors:
A Virtual Valentine in Concert
In this virtual concert, the renowned Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society presents lush, romantic vocal music, performed in the Museum’s authentic Greek Revival double parlor. Singers Anthony Bellov, Amy Gluck, Jane Elizabeth Rady, and Dayle Vander Sande perform rarely heard gems by the world’s greatest 19th-century composers, including Beethoven, Liszt, Richard Strauss, Amy Beach, Johann Strauss II, and others. Selected as a Top Pick for Valentine’s Day: NBC Online and TimeOut NY.
$15, $10 MHM Members; purchase tickets.

This is a VIRTUAL performance. After purchasing your ticket, you will receive a downloadable PDF with viewing instructions. The concert will be available for unlimited viewing through February 21.

 

SPECIAL EXHIBITION OPENS Thursday, February 22, through Sunday, May 25
Tiny Beautiful Things: Baby and Children’s Clothing from the Tredwell Collection
Seabury and Eliza Tredwell had eight children and six grandchildren. On display, a selection of baby and children’s garments and accessories spanning the 19th century – including dresses, coats, bonnets, gloves, and three never-before-seen embroidered baptismal gowns. During the 19th century, Victorian ideals transformed childhood into a time of innocence, play, and purity, a view often limited, in practice, to middle-and upper-class families. The Tredwell children’s clothing offers a unique window into their lives here at the Merchant’s House. Included with museum admission.

 

Friday, February 23, 6:30 p.m.
(Rescheduled from January)
In the Spirit of Science: What’s a Paranormal Investigation All About??
Virtual Program
What exactly goes on during a paranormal investigation? How long does it take, what equipment is used, and what can we hope to realistically discover? Dan, Matilda, and Dr. Lee will discuss past paranormal investigations and what temperature fluctuations, unusual sounds, and visual anomalies might tell us about spirits in a home. What exactly can be considered “proof” of ghosts or spirits? Will we ever be able to prove definitively that ghosts exist and hauntings are real? Join us for an exploration into the scientific method of paranormal investigation.
Free (suggested donation $10); register for “In the Spirit of Science.”

In the Spirit of Science is a monthly video podcast on topics related to ongoing paranormal research at the Merchant’s House. Using the scientific method, with unbiased observation and systematic experimentation, this research is building a better understanding of the strange and fascinating phenomena experienced by staff, volunteers, and visitors at “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times).

The research project and monthly virtual programs are led by neuroscientist Dr. Lee, thanatologist and MHM volunteer Matilda Garrido, and Dan Sturges, founder of Sturges Paranormal, who appears on the Travel Channel’s weekly series, Paranormal Caught on Camera.

 

NEW VIRTUAL PROGRAM SERIES!
Wednesday, February 28, 6 p.m.
“ASK A … ” Funeral Director: Amy Cunningham
Virtual Program

Death and mourning were pervasive and integral parts of life in the 19th century. In the 20th century, with advances in medical care and changes in the industry around death and dying, the end of life moved from the home to hospitals, causing many customs of dying and bereavement to disappear. Today, many of these 19th century customs are making a resurgence.

Join thanatologist Matilda Garrido for interactive interviews with those working today in the field of death and dying. Bring your questions and be part of a larger conversation as we explore death and celebrate life.

Although the funeral industry has evolved and changed dramatically from its rise in the 19th century, we are seeing an increased interest in returning to the practice of home funerals. In February’s “Ask A…” program, home and green funeral director Amy Cunningham will speak with Matilda about the current state of the funeral industry, thoughtfully planning your own funeral, and ecologically-friendly options that are in development.  Free (suggested donation $10); register for “Ask A Funeral Director.”

Amy Cunningham‘s thirty-year career in magazine journalism took an abrupt turn in 2009 when her elderly father’s memorial event in South Carolina opened her up to the healing power and magnificence of end-of-life experiences and funerals.  She attended mortuary school in her mid-fifties and became a New York licensed funeral director in 2012. Her well-respected blog TheInspiredFuneral.com and her earth-friendly company, Fitting Tribute Funeral Services, have contributed to the changing landscape of the funeral industry. When not directing funerals, she teaches end-of-life experience design, funeral planning, and the greening of the funeral business at Green-Wood Cemetery and the NY Open Center/One Spirit Learning Alliance where she is on the faculty of the  Integrative Thanatology Death Education Counselor Program.

Next Up: Wednesday, March 27, 6:30 p.m. “ASK A …” Death Doula

 

MARCH

Thursday, March 7, 6 p.m.
The Peculiar Story of Doesticks and the Fortunetellers
In-person Illustrated Talk with Author Marie Carter
Co-sponsored by Village Preservation, Salmagundi Club, and the Victorian Society
Meet Q.K. Philander Doesticks, P.B. (real name: Mortimer Thomson), a reporter for The New-York Tribune, who in 1857 investigated the fortune tellers of the Lower East Side, and eventually wrote a book about them titled The Witches of New York. When his articles were published in book form in 1858, they catalyzed a series of arrests that both scandalized and delighted the public. But Mortimer was guarding some secrets of his own, and in many ways his own life paralleled the lives of the women he both visited and vilified.

This talk, in celebration of the release of Marie Carter’s book, Mortimer & the Witches: A Nineteenth-Century History of Fortune Telling from Fordham University Press, leads us into the world of Doesticks who hobnobbed with literary luminaries of his time including Mark Twain, Walt Whitman, the wildly-popular columnist Fanny Fern, and biographer James Parton. It will also examine some of the stories of those supposedly “evil” fortune tellers who showed up in the press in surprising ways.

Free (registration required); register for “The Peculiar Story of Doesticks and the Fortunetellers.”

Event location: Rockwell Gallery at Salmagundi Club, 47 Fifth Avenue (at 12th Street).

Marie Carter is a New York City-based writer and tour guide who hails from Scotland. She is a tour guide with Boroughs of the Dead, a NYC walking tour company that specializes in macabre, strange, and ghostly histories. Her most recent book, Mortimer and the Witches, will be published by Fordham University Press in March 2024. She is also the author of The Trapeze Diaries and Holly’s Hurricane, a historical novel set in the future. www.mariewritesandedits.com

 

Walking Tours Resume!
Sunday, March 10 & March 24, 1:30 p.m.
Walking Tour: The Tredwells’ World of 19th Century Noho
(Second & Fourth Sunday of each month)
With the 1825 opening of the Erie Canal, the city’s economy boomed and wealthy merchant families escaped the increasing noise, congestion, and commercialization of the seaport area to move “uptown,” to what is now modern day NoHo, then an exclusive residential enclave. Join us as we explore the Tredwells’ elite neighborhood and discover what life was like for the wealthy merchant class in the mid-19th century. $20; MHM Members Free; purchase Walking Tour tickets.

Walking tours are 90 minutes and meet outside the Merchant’s House.

 

Wednesday, March 13, 6 p.m.
In the Footsteps of Bridget Murphy: A Virtual House Tour
To celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, join us on Zoom for a “back-stairs” virtual tour of the Merchant’s House to experience what daily life was really like for the Tredwells’ Irish servants, and for the thousands of women like them who worked in domestic service in 19th century New York City. We’ll visit four floors of period rooms, from the ground floor kitchen to the 4th floor servants’ quarters, “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in New York City” (Time Out New York).
Free (suggested donation $10); register for “In the Footsteps of Bridget Murphy.”

 

Saturday, March 16, 1:30 p.m.
Walking Tour: Reinventing the Bond Street Neighborhood, 1865-1900
Created and led by museum docent Michelle Barshay
Join us for a captivating journey to discover the pivotal changes that shaped the “Bond Street area,” once a residential neighborhood for wealthy merchant families like the Tredwells. On this 90-minute tour, we’ll witness the dramatic changes that unfolded as commercial interests began to encroach, compelling these families to move uptown and triggering a metamorphosis of the entire neighborhood. Homes evolved into boarding houses, business establishments, or were demolished. By 1900, the once-fashionable neighborhood was primarily a commercial area, known for printing and manufacturing. Our walking tour will lead you to the majestic landmarks – from the imposing De Vinne Press to the Schermerhorn factory, Robbins & Appleton, and the historic Fire Engine #33. $20; MHM Members Free; purchase Walking Tour tickets.

Walking tours are 90 minutes and meet outside the Merchant’s House.

 

Wednesday, March 27, 6 p.m.
“ASK A … ” Death Doula: Diane Button, Angela Shook, & Gabby Jimenez
Virtual Program

In the 19th century, the dying were cared for at home by family, friends, and servants. As we move into the 21st century, we are seeing a desire to return to these practices of compassionate care in the rise of the End of Life Doula profession. What is an End of Life Doula? Should you use one? Join Matilda as she interviews End of Life Doulas Diane Button, Angela Shook, and Gabby Jimenez, authors of The Doula Toolkit.

Free (suggested donation $10); register for “Ask A Death Doula.”

“ASK A…” is a recurring virtual program in which thanatologist Matilda Garrido interviews those working today in the field of death and dying. Death and mourning were pervasive and integral parts of life in the 19th century. In the 20th century, with advances in medical care and changes in the industry around death and dying, the end of life moved from the home to hospitals, causing many customs of dying and bereavement to disappear. Today, many of these 19th century customs are making a resurgence.

Diane Button, MA, has a passion for having deep and meaningful conversations about life and death. She is an author, educator, and has been working with the dying for over 18 years. She is a former National End-of-Life Doula Alliance (NEDA)  board member and has written several books on death, dying, and doula work including Dear Death: Finding Meaning in Life, Peace in Death, and Joy in an Ordinary Day. She recently co-authored The Doula Tool Kit: The Complete Practical Guide for End-of-Life Doulas & Caregivers. Her work has been featured in the NY TimesMaria Shriver’s Sunday Paper, Compassion and Choices, MarketWatch, Hour of Power, AARP, UCSF, and Stanford University. In addition to her work with the dying, Diane is the Director of Dream of a Better World, a 501(c)3 non-profit.

Angela Shook is an end-of-life doula, a hospice volunteer, and a pet loss doula. She is the owner of Dragonfly End-of-Life Services and served on the board of directors of the National End-of-Life Doula Alliance (NEDA) from 2018-2022. Along with Diane Button and Gabby Jimenez, she recently co-authored The Doula Tool Kit: The Complete Practical Guide for End-of-Life Doulas & Caregivers.  She is also an instructor for the University of Vermont’s End-of-Life Doula and Companion Animal Doula professional certificate programs.

Gabby Jimenez is a hospice nurse, end-of-life doula, conscious dying educator, blogger, and author. She is dedicated to helping educate others on the kindest and most compassionate ways to help support someone who is dying, as well as those who are preparing to say goodbye, and are grieving. She has created a beautiful community on Facebook, which has over 142,000 followers who have found comfort and relief from what she shares about death, dying, and grief. Since the recent death of her brother, grief education has become a focus for her, which has offered many people comfort and healing. She is a well-respected public speaker, she teaches classes, and she holds seminars where she generously hands over her tools, education, and experience. Her goal is to help improve the way human beings are cared for when they are dying, and when they are grieving.

 

Friday, March 29, 6:30 p.m. (Rescheduled from February)
In the Spirit of Science
Paranormal Investigation of the Edgar Allan Poe Cottage: The Results Are In!
Co-sponsored by the Bronx Historical Society/Poe Cottage
Poe, his ailing wife, Virginia, and mother-in-law Maria Clemm moved into the c. 1812 cottage in the Bronx during the spring of 1846. It was Poe’s last home. Virginia died in the house in 1847. Dan, Dr. Lee, and Matilda will report on the paranormal investigation undertaken on January 30, the anniversary of Virginia Poe’s death, in the room in which she died. Tune in for the results! Free (suggested donation $10); register for “In the Spirit of Science.”

In the Spirit of Science is a monthly video podcast on topics related to ongoing paranormal research at the Merchant’s House. Using the scientific method, with unbiased observation and systematic experimentation, this research is building a better understanding of the strange and fascinating phenomena experienced by staff, volunteers, and visitors at “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times).

The research project and monthly virtual programs are led by neuroscientist Dr. Lee, thanatologist and MHM volunteer Matilda Garrido, and Dan Sturges, founder of Sturges Paranormal, who appears on the Travel Channel’s weekly series, Paranormal Caught on Camera.

Current Exhibitions

Exhibitions are included with regular museum admission.

Ongoing
See you at the Ball! Objects from New York’s 1860 Prince of Wales Ball
In October 1860, Albert Edward, the 19-year old Prince of Wales, arrived in New York as part of his four-month tour of North America. The visit was the first of its kind by a British Monarch, and his arrival was eagerly anticipated by New York society. As part of the four-day visit, a grand ball was held in the Prince’s honor at the Academy of Music, just a few blocks from the Tredwells’ home. With thousands in attendance, it was the highlight of the social season. On display, items worn or brought to the ball by Miss Anne Punnett. This collection has recently been donated to the Merchant’s House by an anonymous donor.

Through February 14
Preserved! Seaweed and Flower Artworks by the Tredwells
During the 19th century, when the scientific community was largely closed to women, flower art offered an entry into the sciences. For women interested in nature, it was a socially acceptable way to pursue scientific study. Displaying preserved flowers, particularly out-of-season, was also considered fashionable and a way to showcase one’s interests and skills. On display, four of the six seaweed-and-flower artworks from the Museum’s collection, made by the Tredwell women.

Opens February 22
Tiny Beautiful Things: Baby and Children’s Clothing from the Tredwell Collection
Seabury and Eliza Tredwell had eight children and six grandchildren. On display, a selection of baby and children’s garments and accessories spanning the 19th century – including dresses, coats, bonnets, gloves, and three never-before-seen embroidered baptismal gowns. During the 19th century, Victorian ideals transformed childhood into a time of innocence, play, and purity, a view often limited, in practice, to middle-and upper-class families. The Tredwell children’s clothing offers a unique window into their lives here at the Merchant’s House.

Through March 27
The Tredwell Costume Collection: Feathered Cape, 1890-1900 (MHM 2002.1014)
On view, a feathered cape from the Tredwell collection. As the bustle disappeared from women’s fashion and voluminous sleeves gained popularity, capes became the favored form of outerwear. Capes accommodated large sleeves easily, laying gracefully over the top of the puffed leg-of-mutton sleeve. Often featuring an elegant high neckline, capes could be ornately trimmed with fur, beads, and, as with the Tredwell cape, feathers.

 


 

VIRTUAL EXHIBITIONS | ONLINE OFFERINGS