Calendar of Events

Can’t make it live for one of our Virtual Programs?
The day after the event, ticket-holders will receive
a link to the recording, valid for one week.

Masks and proof of vaccination are required for all in-person events.

Most of our programs are offered free of charge.
Please consider making a donation to support future programming —
and help us fight the proposed development next door!

AUGUST

Thursdays in August, until 8 p.m. (last admission 7:30 p.m.)
Summer Evenings in the Garden
The Museum & Garden are open LATE on Thursday evenings all summer long. Enjoy wine in the garden (by donation) and live music and guided tours on select evenings.
$15 General Admission, $10 Seniors/Students; Members FREE. No reservations.

August 4, 6 p.m.Live Music by Jazz Flutist Cheryl Pyle
August 11, 6 p.m.Guided House Tour
August 18 6 p.m.Guided House Tour
August 25, 6 p.m.Guided House Tour


Sunday, August 14 & 28, 12:30 p.m.

Walking Tour – 19th Century NoHo: A Century of Change
In Person!
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House for almost 100 years. You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home on East 4th Street evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial and cultural center during the 19th century.
Tours are 75 minutes and begin outside the museum. $20, FREE for Members. Purchase walking tour tickets here. Become a Member here.


On View through Sunday, September 25

Exhibition: “Finest Surviving:” Ornamental Plasterwork at the Merchant’s House Museum
The 1832 Merchant’s House is one of only 120 buildings in New York City distinguished as an exterior – and interior – landmark. Its intact original ornamental plaster work is considered the “finest surviving” from the period. Learn how the plaster walls, ceilings, and ornamentation in the Merchant’s House were created in the 19th century. On display, original 1832 plaster fragments, as well as molds and plaster casts created by sculptor and ornamental plasterer David Flaharty, who used
the same methods as the early 19th century artisans during a house-wide restoration in the 1970s.

This exhibition also commemorates the 10-year anniversary of our fight to protect the house – and in particular, the 1832 plasterwork – from proposed development next door. Included with regular admission.


On View through Sunday, September 25

On Exhibit: 19th Century Dressing Gowns from the Tredwell Costume Collection
In 19th century polite society, what women wore was dictated by the time of day; to understand and adhere to this was a show of good taste. The interval between when a lady rose from her bed in the morning and dressed for her day was no exception.

According to Florence Hartley’s Ladies Book of Etiquette (first published in 1860), “The most suitable dress for breakfast is a wrapper made to fit the figure loosely.”

The dressing gown, or wrapper, was an informal, functional garment, to be worn only at home, in the boudoir, or in the company of close family members or servants. On display, items from the collection. Included with regular admission.

SEPTEMBER

Sunday, September 11 & 25, 12:30 p.m.
Walking Tour – 19th Century NoHo: A Century of Change
In Person!
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House for almost 100 years. You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home on East 4th Street evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial and cultural center during the 19th century.
Tours are 75 minutes and begin outside the museum. $20, FREE for Members. Purchase walking tour tickets here. Become a Member here.


Friday, September 16, 6:30 p.m.

In the Spirit of Science: Researching the Paranormal Using the Scientific Method
Virtual Program
September’s Topic — Beyond the Ouija Board: The History and Science of  Communicating with Spirits 
You’ve heard of the Ouija Board, but what about other traditional techniques for communicating with spirits? We’ll talk about the psychomanteum, the Ganzfeld technique, automatic writing, and other methods that have been used throughout the years to contact the “other side”. Along with their historical usage, we’ll discuss the science behind each of them and how they might work if they do work!

“In the Spirit of Science” is an ongoing virtual program in which paranormal investigator Dan Sturges, neuroscientist Dr. Lee, and Thanatologist Matilda Garrido discuss Dan & Dr. Lee’s ground-breaking paranormal research, which began in 2020, when the Museum closed due to COVID-19. Through unbiased observation and systematic experimentation, this research is building a better understanding of the strange and fascinating phenomena observed at the Merchant’s House. Free (suggested donation $10); register for “In the Spirit of Science” here.


Wednesday, September 21, 6 p.m.

How The Good Death Became The Well-Managed Death: Changing Attitudes towards Death and Dying in the 19th Century
A Virtual Talk with Thanatologist Matilda Garrido

With longer life spans and the ability to predict disease (but lack of curative medical options), fears about death began to rise in the 19th century in the middle and upper classes.  Death and dying became something to “manage,” overseen by a revolving door of professionals such as the doctor, priest, lawyer, and undertaker. In this virtual talk, thanatologist and MHM Volunteer Matilda Garrido will use Seabury Tredwell’s 1865 death to explore this change in attitudes towards death and what it meant for the middle and upper classes as the 19th century progressed. Free (suggested donation $10); register for “The Well-Managed Death” here.

Matilda Garrido has a masters of science in thanatology and is certified in thanatology through the Association for Death Education and Counseling.  Her extensive experience with hospice patients and caregivers and bereavement research have informed her focus on and commitment to death education, caring for the bereaved, and end of life matters.

This program is the second in a series exploring death, dying, and mourning customs in the 19th century.
August 10 —  “As They Last Were:” Postmortem Photography in 19th Century New Yorkclick here to view on YouTube.
October 19, 6 p.m. — “Death Cannot Make Our Souls Afraid:” 19th Century Mourning Customs, a Virtual Talk with Museum Historian Ann Haddad


On View through Sunday, September 25

Exhibition: “Finest Surviving:” Ornamental Plasterwork at the Merchant’s House Museum
The 1832 Merchant’s House is one of only 120 buildings in New York City distinguished as an exterior – and interior – landmark. Its intact original ornamental plaster work is considered the “finest surviving” from the period. Learn how the plaster walls, ceilings, and ornamentation in the Merchant’s House were created in the 19th century. On display, original 1832 plaster fragments, as well as molds and plaster casts created by sculptor and ornamental plasterer David Flaharty, who used
the same methods as the early 19th century artisans during a house-wide restoration in the 1970s.

This exhibition also commemorates the 10-year anniversary of our fight to protect the house – and in particular, the 1832 plasterwork – from proposed development next door. Included with regular admission.


On View through Sunday, September 25

On Exhibit: 19th Century Dressing Gowns from the Tredwell Costume Collection
In 19th century polite society, what women wore was dictated by the time of day; to understand and adhere to this was a show of good taste. The interval between when a lady rose from her bed in the morning and dressed for her day was no exception.

According to Florence Hartley’s Ladies Book of Etiquette (first published in 1860), “The most suitable dress for breakfast is a wrapper made to fit the figure loosely.”

The dressing gown, or wrapper, was an informal, functional garment, to be worn only at home, in the boudoir, or in the company of close family members or servants. On display, items from the collection. Included with regular admission.

OCTOBER

Sunday, October 9 & 23, 12:30 p.m.
Walking Tour – 19th Century NoHo: A Century of Change
In Person!
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House for almost 100 years . You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home on East 4th Street evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial and cultural center during the 19th century.
Tours are 75 minutes and begin outside the museum. $20, FREE for Members. Purchase walking tour tickets here. Become a Member here.


Wednesday, October 19, 6 p.m.

‘Death Cannot Make Our Souls Afraid’: 19th Century Mourning Customs
A Virtual Talk with Museum Historian Ann Haddad
Grief was more than just an emotion for Americans during the 19th century — it was a way of life. The moment Seabury Tredwell drew his last breath, in March 1865, his family put into motion an elaborate system of mourning customs that both announced their grief to the community and provided some measure of release from their suffering.

Join Museum Historian Ann Haddad to explore the origins and significance of these somber yet comforting rituals, from widows’ weeds and crepe-draped mirrors to corpse coolers and funeral biscuits. Free (suggested donation $10); register for “Death Cannot Make Our Souls Afraid” here.


ONLY FOUR NIGHTS!

Thursday, October 27; Friday, October 28; Saturday, October 29; Sunday, October 30
In-Person CANDLELIGHT GHOST TOURS of Manhattan’s Most Haunted House
50 minute tours run every half hour, 6:30 to 10 p.m. 

Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” by flickering candlelight to hear chilling – and true – tales of decades of otherworldly activity in the house, the results of years of paranormal investigations – and the latest stunning scientific findings.

The Tredwell family lived at 29 East 4th Street for nearly 100 years, and at least eight people died in the house. Reports of strange and inexplicable occurrences have been widespread since Gertrude, the last surviving Tredwell, died in 1933. Is it Gertrude who is watching over her family home? Join us on a CANDLELIGHT GHOST TOUR and decide for yourself. 

$45; $35 MHM Members. Purchase tickets for Candlelight Ghost Tours HERE.
MEMBERS: enter code
GHOST at checkout to receive the discounted Member price.
Become a Member HERE:


Thursday, October 27; Friday, October 28; Saturday, October 29, Sunday, October 30, 10:30 p.m.
In-Person & SUPER SPOOKY CANDLELIGHT GHOST TOURS with PARANORMAL INVESTIGATOR DAN STURGES
In 2020, the museum closed due to COVID-19, leaving the house empty of staff and visitorsDan Sturges, who has undertaken paranormal investigations at the Merchant’s House for 15 years, teamed up with neuroscientist Dr. Lee to conduct scientific research using specialized equipment custom-built for the house. Mounting fact-based evidence points to the very likely reality of paranormal activity at the Merchant’s House. Join Dan and decide for yourself.

Join paranormal investigator Dan Sturges on a 90-minute In-Person Super Spooky Candlelight Ghost Tour for an in-depth look at the latest research and findings. Dan is the founder of Sturges Paranormal and appears on the Travel Channel’s weekly series, Paranormal Caught on Camera. He has performed investigations at the Merchant’s House – and documented his spine-chilling findings – since 2007.

$65; $55 MHM Members. Purchase tickets for the SUPER SPOOKY Ghost Tour here.
MEMBERS: enter code
SPOOKY at checkout to receive the discounted Member price.
Become a Member HERE


Halloween Night! Monday, October 31

Chant Macabre: Songs from the Crypt
Halloween Concert with the Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society
Ghosts, ghouls, and goblins haunt the lyrics of 19th century song. Come be spooked by these harrowing tales as the Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society bewitches your imagination and sings shivers down your spine, echoing sumptuous, rarely performed songs in an authentic period parlor. Singers Anthony Bellov, Amy Gluck, Jane Elizabeth Rady, and Dayle Vander Sande. Music by Schubert, Liszt, Debussy, Duparc, Loewe, Mussorgsky, Humperdinck, and others. 75 minutes. Ticket information coming soon!

 

NOVEMBER

10th Anniversary! Limited Engagement, November 23 to December 29
A Christmas Carol at the Merchant’s House: Charles Dickens in New York, 1867
Presented in association with Summoners Ensemble Theatre
Join Mr. Dickens, portrayed by John Kevin Jones, as he tells his timeless Christmas tale in the elegant intact Greek Revival double parlor of the landmark 1832 Merchant’s House Museum. Surrounded by 19th century holiday decorations, flickering candles, and richly appointed period furnishings, audiences will be transported back 150 years in this captivating one-hour performance created from Dickens’ own script. Tickets and information.

 


 

VIRTUAL EXHIBITIONS | ONLINE OFFERINGS

 


 

New York Landmarks Conservancy’s I HEART NY Landmarks Contest
2022 WINNER! “FAVORITE LANDMARK”