Calendar of Events

All of our Virtual Events are recorded.
Free events are posted to the Museum’s YouTube page.
Ticket-holders for paid Virtual Events will receive an email with access to the recording.

Masks are required for all in-person events.

Most of our virtual programs are offered free of charge.
Please consider making a donation to support future programming —
and help us fight the proposed development next door!

JANUARY

Exhibition on display through March 26
19th-Century Valentines: Confections of Affection
Ornate and extravagant lace paper valentines reached their zenith during the second half of the 19th century. Victorian sentimentalism combined with advancing print technology fostered an outpouring of handmade and manufactured cards. Lace paper made its appearance in the 1830s, followed by ‘scraps,’ small embossed cut-outs colored by early chromo-lithography.

On display is a selection of 19th century valentines, including several from the Tredwell Collection. Delicate and lacy, these expressions of love celebrate the whimsy and romance of the Golden Age of Valentines. Included with regular admission.

 

Exhibition on display through March 12
Winter Warmth: How the Tredwells Bundled Up
In the 19th century, there was no escaping the cold. Even with brisk fires burning, water froze in wash bowls, ink froze in wells, and wine in their bottles.  People did what little they could to keep the cold at bay, but interior temperatures in the 19th century were well below today’s standard 68 degrees. On display, rarely seen objects from the original Tredwell collection, including a foot stove, quilts, a muff,  hand-knit ‘joint warmers,’ and a crocheted capelette, all items the family used to (try to) keep warm during the cold winter months.  Included with regular admission.

 

Exhibition on display through March 5
Tredwell Costume Collection: “Fancy Dress” Costume (1885-1890), MHM 2002.0825
In the late 19th century, “fancy dress” costume balls were grand social affairs and widely reported in the press. Guests dressed in very elaborate costumes, and historical themes were most popular. On display, a sack-back – or sacque-back – gown, also known as a robe à la Française. The style of dress was popular in the 1700s, and was distinguished by its back; fabric was arranged in box pleats at the shoulders and fell to the floor in a small train. The sleeves of this dress harken back to an even earlier time, the 16th century, enhancing the romance and nostalgia of a time gone by. Included with museum admission.

 

FEBRUARY

Tuesday, February 14, 7 p.m.
Love in the Parlors: A Valentine in Concert
The renowned Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society presents lush, romantic vocal selections by some of the world’s great 19th-century composers including Beethoven, Liszt, Richard Strauss, Amy Beach, Johann Strauss II, and others performed in the Museum’s authentic Greek Revival double parlor. Singers Anthony Bellov, Amy Gluck, Jane Elizabeth Rady, and Dayle Vander Sande. This performance will take place in-house and livestream. Selected as a Top Pick for Valentine’s Day: NBC Online and TimeOut NY! 80 minutes.

This performance will be presented both in-person and virtually.
In-person tickets: $50, $35 MHM Members. Capacity is strictly limited and masks are required. Purchase Tickets for In-Person Concert.

Virtual livestream tickets: $20, $15 MHM Members. Ticketholders will receive a downloadable PDF with viewing instructions. Purchase Tickets for Virtual Concert.

 

Thursday, February 16, 6 p.m.
Free, “Half-Free,” and Enslaved: Black Life in New Amsterdam
Virtual Talk via Zoom

The first  enslaved people of African descent to be brought to New Amsterdam were eventually emancipated and granted farmland on and near what is now the Merchant’s House Museum. Join Museum Historian Ann Haddad as she explores the complex story of Black life in the 17th century Dutch settlement, and the free, “half-free,” and enslaved Black people who raised families, established a strong community, and contributed to the development of New York City. Newly opened Manuel Plaza, adjacent to the Museum, pays tribute to these men and women who settled on what was known as the “Land of the Blacks.” Free; Register for “Black Life in New Amsterdam.”

 

Saturday, February 18, 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Inside Old New York: A Neighborhood & House Tour
In-Person!
Co-Sponsored by The Gilded Gentleman Podcast and Bowery Boys Walking Tours
Join Carl Raymond, host of The Gilded Gentleman history podcast for this unique look inside the world of Old New York. In many ways, the roots of the society that fueled the Gilded Age began here, with the old money families, like the Astors.  Wealthy families, such as the Tredwells, who owned what is today the Merchant’s House Museum, were the foundation of the economy and society we call “Old New York.”

This 90-minute in-person tour will begin with a brief walk in the neighborhood south of Astor Place, pre-Civil War New York’s wealthiest area and then proceed to the Merchant’s House Museum. This unique expertly guided tour inside the house will include the formal parlor and dining room, the families private areas and bedrooms, and we’ll even have a chance to visit the servant’s quarters. $40; Register for “Inside Old New York.”

 

Exhibition on display through March 5
Tredwell Costume Collection: “Fancy Dress” Costume (1885-1890), MHM 2002.0825
In the late 19th century, “fancy dress” costume balls were grand social affairs and widely reported in the press. Guests dressed in very elaborate costumes, and historical themes were most popular. On display, a sack-back – or sacque-back – gown, also known as a robe à la Française. The style of dress was popular in the 1700s, and was distinguished by its back; fabric was arranged in box pleats at the shoulders and fell to the floor in a small train. The sleeves of this dress harken back to an even earlier time, the 16th century, enhancing the romance and nostalgia of a time gone by. Included with museum admission.

 

Exhibition on display through Sunday, March 12
Winter Warmth: How the Tredwells Bundled Up
In the 19th century, there was no escaping the cold. Even with brisk fires burning, water froze in wash bowls, ink froze in wells, and wine in their bottles.  People did what little they could to keep the cold at bay, but interior temperatures in the 19th century were well below today’s standard 68 degrees. On display, rarely seen objects from the original Tredwell collection, including a foot stove, quilts, a muff,  hand-knit ‘joint warmers,’ and a crocheted capelette, all items the family used to (try to) keep warm during the cold winter months.  Included with regular admission.

 

Exhibition on display through Sunday, March 26
19th-Century Valentines: Confections of Affection
Ornate and extravagant lace paper valentines reached their zenith during the second half of the 19th century. Victorian sentimentalism combined with advancing print technology fostered an outpouring of handmade and manufactured cards. Lace paper made its appearance in the 1830s, followed by ‘scraps,’ small embossed cut-outs colored by early chromo-lithography.

On display is a selection of 19th century valentines, including several from the Tredwell Collection. Delicate and lacy, these expressions of love celebrate the whimsy and romance of the Golden Age of Valentines. Included with regular admission.

 

MARCH

Friday, March 10, 6:30 p.m.
In the Spirit of Science: Researching the Paranormal Using the Scientific Method
Virtual Program
March’s Topic: “What Is Psi?” (Other Than the 23rd Letter of the Greek Alphabet)
(Rescheduled from January 20)
ESP, clairvoyance, deja vu, precognition, synchronicity. These and other psychic or paranormal abilities and phenomena are all psi, experiences of the human mind that seem to violate our common sense view of space and time. What kinds of experiments can be done to validate psi? What do these experiments “prove,” if anything? Join Dan, Matilda, and Dr. Lee as they delve into psi, one of the most researched areas of parapsychology.

In the Spirit of Science is an ongoing virtual program about ground-breaking paranormal research, that began in 2020, when the Museum closed due to COVID-19. Through unbiased observation and systematic experimentation, this research is building a better understanding of the strange and fascinating phenomena observed at the Merchant’s House.

The project is led by neuroscientist Dr. Lee and Dan Sturges, founder of Sturges Paranormal, who appears on the Travel Channel’s weekly series, Paranormal Caught on Camera. He has performed investigations at the Merchant’s House – and documented his spine-chilling findings – since 2007. Thanatologist Matilda Garrido joins Dan and Dr. Lee to discuss their research findings.
FREE (suggested donation $10). Register for In the Spirit of Science.

 

Saturday, March 11, 3 p.m. (Raindate Sunday, March 26)
Walking Tour: Ghostly Women of Greenwich Village – The Haunting Histories of the Neighborhood’s Most Iconic Female Ghosts
With Andrea Janes, of Boroughs of the Dead.
Meet the ghostly women of Greenwich Village on this 90-minute walking tour that explores the haunting histories of the neighborhood’s most iconic female ghosts. Discover the stories of Gertrude Tredwell, the women of the Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire, Edith Wharton, Rose Butler, Jan Bryant Bartell, Theodosia Burr, and more. On this tour we’ll discuss the prevalence and significance of women in ghost stories as well as sharing some chilling and fascinating true life tales. $30; MHM Members $25. Purchase Tickets to “Ghostly Women of Greenwich Village” Walking Tour.

Andrea Janes tells ghost stories for a living. She is the co-author of A Haunted History of Invisible Women and the owner and founder of Boroughs of the Dead, a boutique tour company dedicated to dark and unusual walking tours of New York City.

 

Sunday, March 26, 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Inside Old New York: A Neighborhood & House Tour
In-Person!
Co-Sponsored by The Gilded Gentleman Podcast and Bowery Boys Walking Tours
Join Carl Raymond, host of The Gilded Gentleman history podcast for this unique look inside the world of Old New York. In many ways, the roots of the society that fueled the Gilded Age began here, with the old money families, like the Astors.  Wealthy families, such as the Tredwells, who owned what is today the Merchant’s House Museum, were the foundation of the economy and society we call “Old New York.”

This 90-minute in-person tour will begin with a brief walk in the neighborhood south of Astor Place, pre-Civil War New York’s wealthiest area and then proceed to the Merchant’s House Museum. This unique expertly guided tour inside the house will include the formal parlor and dining room, the families private areas and bedrooms, and we’ll even have a chance to visit the servant’s quarters. $40; Register for “Inside Old New York.”

 

Exhibition on display through Sunday, March 5
Tredwell Costume Collection: “Fancy Dress” Costume (1885-1890), MHM 2002.0825
In the late 19th century, “fancy dress” costume balls were grand social affairs and widely reported in the press. Guests dressed in very elaborate costumes, and historical themes were most popular. On display, a sack-back – or sacque-back – gown, also known as a robe à la Française. The style of dress was popular in the 1700s, and was distinguished by its back; fabric was arranged in box pleats at the shoulders and fell to the floor in a small train. The sleeves of this dress harken back to an even earlier time, the 16th century, enhancing the romance and nostalgia of a time gone by. Included with museum admission.

 

Exhibition on display through Sunday, March 12
Winter Warmth: How the Tredwells Bundled Up
In the 19th century, there was no escaping the cold. Even with brisk fires burning, water froze in wash bowls, ink froze in wells, and wine in their bottles.  People did what little they could to keep the cold at bay, but interior temperatures in the 19th century were well below today’s standard 68 degrees. On display, rarely seen objects from the original Tredwell collection, including a foot stove, quilts, a muff,  hand-knit ‘joint warmers,’ and a crocheted capelette, all items the family used to (try to) keep warm during the cold winter months.  Included with regular admission.

 

Exhibition on display through Sunday, March 26
19th-Century Valentines: Confections of Affection
Ornate and extravagant lace paper valentines reached their zenith during the second half of the 19th century. Victorian sentimentalism combined with advancing print technology fostered an outpouring of handmade and manufactured cards. Lace paper made its appearance in the 1830s, followed by ‘scraps,’ small embossed cut-outs colored by early chromo-lithography.

On display is a selection of 19th century valentines, including several from the Tredwell Collection. Delicate and lacy, these expressions of love celebrate the whimsy and romance of the Golden Age of Valentines. Included with regular admission.

 


 

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