2018 Past Programs

2018

JANUARY EVENTS

NEW YEAR’S DAY, Monday, January 1, 2 to 5 p.m.
‘Come Calling’ on New Year’s Day
Paying calls on friends and family on New Year’s Day was one of Old New York’s most cherished customs. Join us for tours of the house, 19th century readings about New Year’s Day celebrations, and punch and confectionery, as we continue the 19th century tradition of renewing, reviving, and reaffirming friendships. Holiday Raffle drawing at 4:30 p.m. “New York seemed to enjoy a general carnival. Broadway, from one end to the other, was alive with private carriages, omnibuses, cabs, and curricles, and lines of pedestrians fringed the carriageways.” From the Diary of Philip Hone, 1844. $20, FREE for members Members.

Thursday, January 18, through Monday, April 30
Exhibition: The Tredwell Books Collection and the Changing 19th Century Culture of Books
Over the course of the their almost 100-year residency on East 4th Street, the Tredwells collected 314 books. These volumes, many inscribed, provide a glimpse into the family’s interests, tastes, and intellectual pursuits over the century. It is not surprising that the most common subject/genre of literature is education, including foreign languages, since books in the 19th century were meant to be studied. Religion, biography, poetry, and fiction followed.

Most of the Tredwell books were published in New York City during the early to mid-19th century, a period known as the “emerging mass culture of print.” The availability of booksellers close to the Tredwells’ home and the close proximity of the three largest libraries in New York City all place the family in the center of a rapidly changing 19th century book culture. Based on the amount and the variety of books they owned, and their condition, which shows good use, the Tredwells were active participants.
Free with General Admission

Friday, January 19, 6:30 & 7 p.m. 
Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50-60 minutes. $30, $20 Members.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: Friday, February 16, March 16, April 20, May 18, June 15, July 20.

Monday, January 22, 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Illustrated lecture: The 19th Century City and the Book Market
Architectural historian Francis Morrone has for the last several years been studying the history of New York as a center of American book culture – publishing, printing, bookselling, libraries, and book reviewing. Morrone will discuss the Village’s and the Union Square area’s 19th-century history as a center of the book trade — of publishers, bookstores, and printers.

Mr. Morrone’s lecture will highlight  the museum’s exhibition (above) “The Tredwell Book Collection and the Changing 19th Century Culture of Books.” The Tredwell books provide a glimpse into the family’s interests, tastes, and intellectual pursuits, and were published almost exclusively in New York City during the early to mid-19th century, a period known as the “emerging mass culture of print.”

Admission is free.
NOTE LOCATION: Jefferson Market Library, 425 Sixth  Avenue (at 10th Street)
Co-sponsored by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and the Merchant’s House Museum.

Wednesday, January 24, 6:30 p.m. SOLD OUT!
Illustrated Lecture: Lafayette Place/Lafayette Street: A Topographical History
by Francis Morrone

When and how did fashionable and tranquil Lafayette Place — 100-feet wide, 3-blocks long, with no cross streets — come into being in the 19th century? By what stages did it evolve? How and when did Lafayette Place become Lafayette Street, and how did the new, much longer, street develop? This lecture will cover, among other things, the conditions that both brought the Merchant’s House into being — and its preservation and survival defied. Not least, this will be a lecture on New York maps and their use in research.

A collaboration with the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art.
$30 General Public, $20 MHM & ICAA Members. Seating is limited. Doors open at 6:15 p.m.

Francis Morrone is a renowned architectural historian and writer. The author of eleven books, including, most recently, “Guide to New York City Urban Landscapes” (W.W. Norton, 2013). Morrone has also written highly-regarded architectural guidebooks to Philadelphia, and Brooklyn. His writings have appeared in many publications, including the Wall Street Journal, the New Criterion, City Journal, Humanities and the New York Sun, where he was an art and architecture critic. He teaches architectural and urban history at New York University, and is the recipient of the university’s Excellence in Teaching Award. Travel + Leisure magazine named him as one of the 13 best tour guides in the world. Other awards include the Arthur Ross Award of the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art.

FEBRUARY EVENTS

Friday, February 9, 6:30 p.m. SOLD OUT!
Mind Reading and Mysticism at the Merchant’s House with Mentalist Kent Axell
Join renowned mentalist Kent Axell in the Tredwell family’s Greek Revival double parlor as he takes us back in time 150 years to experience mind reading, magic, and mystery.  In the mid-19th century, New Yorkers like the Tredwells hosted neighbors and friends in their home to showcase the latest in mysticism and psychic entertainments. Spiritualism, the belief that the living can talk to the dead, had become a phenomenon in 1848 thanks to the now-infamous Fox sisters and grew as a popular form of parlor entertainment. Whether he answers your sealed questions, reads your mind — or controls it — you’re guaranteed to feel the haunting touch of one of history’s most obscure, and awe-inspiring, art forms.
Capacity is very limited. $40, $50 VIP Seats (first two rows), $30 MHM Members. This event is SOLD OUT.

Wednesday, February 14, 7 p.m. (Pre-concert Reception 6 p.m.)
Love in the Parlors — A Valentine in Concert
The Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society presents lush, romantic vocal music of the world’s greatest 19th-century composers performed in the Museum’s elegant Greek Revival double parlor. Singers Anthony Bellov, Amy Gluck, Jane Elizabeth Rady, and Dayle Vander Sande perform rarely heard gems by Schubert, Brahms, Duparc, Dvorak, Amy Beach, Johann Strauss II, and others.
75 minutes. Very limited capacity.
$50, VIP $60 (first two rows), $30 MHM Members. SOLD OUT! Click here to join the waitlist.

Pre-concert Reception, 6 p.m.
Join us for light hors d’oeuvres and a glass of bubbly in our cozy, candlelit 1850s kitchen before the concert.
$25,  $15 MHM Members.

Friday, February 16, 6:30 & 7 p.m. 
Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50-60 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: Friday, March 16, April 20, May 18, June 15, July 20.