2018 Past Programs

2018

JANUARY EVENTS

NEW YEAR’S DAY, Monday, January 1, 2 to 5 p.m.
‘Come Calling’ on New Year’s Day
Paying calls on friends and family on New Year’s Day was one of Old New York’s most cherished customs. Join us for tours of the house, 19th century readings about New Year’s Day celebrations, and punch and confectionery, as we continue the 19th century tradition of renewing, reviving, and reaffirming friendships. Holiday Raffle drawing at 4:30 p.m. “New York seemed to enjoy a general carnival. Broadway, from one end to the other, was alive with private carriages, omnibuses, cabs, and curricles, and lines of pedestrians fringed the carriageways.” From the Diary of Philip Hone, 1844. $20, FREE for members Members.

Thursday, January 18, through Monday, April 30
Exhibition: The Tredwell Books Collection and the Changing 19th Century Culture of Books
Over the course of the their almost 100-year residency on East 4th Street, the Tredwells collected 314 books. These volumes, many inscribed, provide a glimpse into the family’s interests, tastes, and intellectual pursuits over the century. It is not surprising that the most common subject/genre of literature is education, including foreign languages, since books in the 19th century were meant to be studied. Religion, biography, poetry, and fiction followed.

Most of the Tredwell books were published in New York City during the early to mid-19th century, a period known as the “emerging mass culture of print.” The availability of booksellers close to the Tredwells’ home and the close proximity of the three largest libraries in New York City all place the family in the center of a rapidly changing 19th century book culture. Based on the amount and the variety of books they owned, and their condition, which shows good use, the Tredwells were active participants.
Free with General Admission

Thursday, January 18, through Monday, April 30
Exhibition: The Tredwell Books Collection and the Changing 19th Century Culture of Books
Over the course of the their almost 100-year residency on East 4th Street, the Tredwells collected 314 books. These volumes, many inscribed, provide a glimpse into the family’s interests, tastes, and intellectual pursuits over the century. It is not surprising that the most common subject/genre of literature is education, including foreign languages, since books in the 19th century were meant to be studied. Religion, biography, poetry, and fiction followed.

Most of the Tredwell books were published in New York City during the early to mid-19th century, a period known as the “emerging mass culture of print.” The availability of booksellers close to the Tredwells’ home and the close proximity of the three largest libraries in New York City all place the family in the center of a rapidly changing 19th century book culture. Based on the amount and the variety of books they owned, and their condition, which shows good use, the Tredwells were active participants.

Friday, January 19, 6:30 & 7 p.m. 
Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50-60 minutes. $30, $20 Members.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: Friday, February 16, March 16, April 20, May 18, June 15, July 20.

Monday, January 22, 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Illustrated lecture: The 19th Century City and the Book Market
Architectural historian Francis Morrone has for the last several years been studying the history of New York as a center of American book culture – publishing, printing, bookselling, libraries, and book reviewing. Morrone will discuss the Village’s and the Union Square area’s 19th-century history as a center of the book trade — of publishers, bookstores, and printers.

Mr. Morrone’s lecture will highlight  the museum’s exhibition (above) “The Tredwell Book Collection and the Changing 19th Century Culture of Books.” The Tredwell books provide a glimpse into the family’s interests, tastes, and intellectual pursuits, and were published almost exclusively in New York City during the early to mid-19th century, a period known as the “emerging mass culture of print.”

Admission is free.
NOTE LOCATION: Jefferson Market Library, 425 Sixth  Avenue (at 10th Street)
Co-sponsored by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and the Merchant’s House Museum.

Wednesday, January 24, 6:30 p.m. SOLD OUT!
Illustrated Lecture: Lafayette Place/Lafayette Street: A Topographical History
by Francis Morrone

When and how did fashionable and tranquil Lafayette Place — 100-feet wide, 3-blocks long, with no cross streets — come into being in the 19th century? By what stages did it evolve? How and when did Lafayette Place become Lafayette Street, and how did the new, much longer, street develop? This lecture will cover, among other things, the conditions that both brought the Merchant’s House into being — and its preservation and survival defied. Not least, this will be a lecture on New York maps and their use in research.

A collaboration with the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art.
$30 General Public, $20 MHM & ICAA Members. Seating is limited. Doors open at 6:15 p.m.

Francis Morrone is a renowned architectural historian and writer. The author of eleven books, including, most recently, “Guide to New York City Urban Landscapes” (W.W. Norton, 2013). Morrone has also written highly-regarded architectural guidebooks to Philadelphia, and Brooklyn. His writings have appeared in many publications, including the Wall Street Journal, the New Criterion, City Journal, Humanities and the New York Sun, where he was an art and architecture critic. He teaches architectural and urban history at New York University, and is the recipient of the university’s Excellence in Teaching Award. Travel + Leisure magazine named him as one of the 13 best tour guides in the world. Other awards include the Arthur Ross Award of the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art.

FEBRUARY EVENTS

Friday, February 9, 6:30 p.m. SOLD OUT!
Mind Reading and Mysticism at the Merchant’s House with Mentalist Kent Axell
Join renowned mentalist Kent Axell in the Tredwell family’s Greek Revival double parlor as he takes us back in time 150 years to experience mind reading, magic, and mystery.  In the mid-19th century, New Yorkers like the Tredwells hosted neighbors and friends in their home to showcase the latest in mysticism and psychic entertainments. Spiritualism, the belief that the living can talk to the dead, had become a phenomenon in 1848 thanks to the now-infamous Fox sisters and grew as a popular form of parlor entertainment. Whether he answers your sealed questions, reads your mind — or controls it — you’re guaranteed to feel the haunting touch of one of history’s most obscure, and awe-inspiring, art forms.
Capacity is very limited. $40, $50 VIP Seats (first two rows), $30 MHM Members. This event is SOLD OUT.

Wednesday, February 14, 7 p.m. (Pre-concert Reception 6 p.m.)
Love in the Parlors — A Valentine in Concert
The Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society presents lush, romantic vocal music of the world’s greatest 19th-century composers performed in the Museum’s elegant Greek Revival double parlor. Singers Anthony Bellov, Amy Gluck, Jane Elizabeth Rady, and Dayle Vander Sande perform rarely heard gems by Schubert, Brahms, Duparc, Dvorak, Amy Beach, Johann Strauss II, and others.
75 minutes. Very limited capacity.
$50, VIP $60 (first two rows), $30 MHM Members. SOLD OUT!

Pre-concert Reception, 6 p.m.
Join us for light hors d’oeuvres and a glass of bubbly in our cozy, candlelit 1850s kitchen before the concert.
$25,  $15 MHM Members.

Thursday, February 15, through Monday, April 30
The Changing Silhouette of 19th Century Fashion: The Decade of the 1850s
Day Dress, c. 1858, MHM 2002.0815
The Tredwell Costume Collection comprises more than 400 articles of clothing. The core of the collection consists of 39 dresses documented to have been owned and worn by the women of the family. The Changing Silhouette of 19th Century Fashion is a changing exhibition featuring Tredwell dresses from the decades of the 19th century. These dresses show the changing silhouette of fashion over 100 years, and tell us about the women who wore them and the society in which they lived.

One of the defining characteristics of ladies fashion in the 1850s is the pagoda sleeve. Pagoda sleeves are wide, bell-shaped sleeves that necessitate the use of detachable undersleeves to complete the look of the dress. The style was first introduced in 1848, and appears to have been a favorite of the Tredwell women – of the 39 dresses in the Tredwell Costume Collection, 20 are constructed with pagoda sleeves.

Fourth in the series is a one-piece, summer day dress of white cotton printed with single flower heads within blue circles and surrounded by pairs of tiny blue dots. The dress is hand sewn, and consists of an attached skirt and bodice with pagoda sleeves. The sleeve hems are finished in ¾” wide embroidered “white work” trim. A pocket is sewn in to the right-hand side of the skirt.

Friday, February 16, 6:30 & 7 p.m. 
Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50-60 minutes. $30, $20 Members.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: Friday, March 16, April 20, May 18, June 15, July 20.

Saturday, February 24, March 24, and April 28 – 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Behind-the-Ropes: Insider’s Tours of the Merchant’s House
Join us for a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen for coffee and a focused overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and its intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic and open locked doors … and more. From late Federal to Greek Revival; Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene, you’ll gain new insight and perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

Saturday, February 24 – The Architecture of an 1832 Landmark  SOLD OUT!
We’ll explore in detail the architecture of Antebellum New York, how to differentiate between styles, and tips on the fine points of what to look for on your own explorations. Then we’ll examine the 1832 Merchant’s House in depth, one of only 117 buildings designated both an interior and exterior landmark in New York, including details of the ornamental plaster, considered the finest surviving from the period and several spaces not normally seen by the regular Museum visitor.

Saturday, March 24 – 100 Years of Domestic Lighting
In March, we’ll examine the evolution of 19th century domestic lighting and the story of technological advances and changing lifestyles it tells using examples throughout the Museum, including many not normally on exhibition.

Saturday, April 28 – Changing Tastes in 19th Century Furniture
In the final tour of this series , we’ll discuss the finer points of the original Tredwell family collection of furniture and what it tells us about both the tastes and values of Antebellum New Yorkers and how growing international connections made lasting impact on design, trade, and international relations.

About presenter Anthony Bellov: Bachelor of Architecture, Pratt Institute; graduate, Museum Leadership program, Bank Street College; certified New York State real estate instructor/lecturer; long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum, and an aficionado in 19th century American decorative arts and architecture.

Limited to 20 participants.
$30, $25 Members. Series of three programs, $75, $60 MHM Members

Tuesday, February 27, 6:30 p.m.
Members-Only Collection Close-Up
Come for a tour and a behind-the-scenes look at the Tredwell Books Collection. In conjunction with our current exhibition, The Tredwell Books Collection and the Changing 19th Century Culture of Books
FREE for Members. Reservations required.
Members, please email nyc1832@merchantshouse.org. To become a member, click here.

MARCH EVENTS

Sunday, March 11, 12:30 p.m. SOLD OUT!
Second Sunday Walking Tours resume!

In the Footsteps of Bridget Murphy: A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho 
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

In this special walking tour, we’ll explore the world of Irish immigrants, who flooded into New York City in the 19th century to escape famine and hardship in Ireland; in 1855, approximately 24,000 Irish immigrants worked as servants for wealthy families like the Tredwells. We’ll explore the world of these immigrants and see sites associated with a servant’s life outside the walls of her employer’s home.

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15; FREE for Members.  Next walking tours: April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8.

Due to popular demand, we have opened up a second walking tour on Sunday, March 11, at 12:45 p.m.
Sunday, March 11, 12:45 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ and see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. $15, Free for Members.

Tuesday, March 13, 6:30 p.m.
Illustrated lecture: Journey of Hope: The Irish in New York
With Tara Rider, Ph.D
To escape religious persecution and decades of poverty and famine, waves of Irish immigrants arrived in New York from the 18th century on. By the mid-19th century, one quarter of the City’s population was Irish. Many Irish women and girls found jobs as live-in servants for New York’s wealthy citizens, the Tredwells among them. It is a compelling story: they typically emigrated from Ireland at a young age, were willing to do the work others shunned, and often endured cruel prejudice. Yet, despite it all, these women managed to persevere, and collectively sent millions of dollars home so that their relatives could escape the troubles at home for a better life.

The Museum’s servants quarters are “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in Manhattan” (TimeOut New York). Unfortunately, little is known about the Tredwells’ four servants besides their names, ages, and place of birth (Ireland), taken from census reports; they themselves left no written record. One thing is certain though: the family’s lifestyle of on East 4th Street would have been utterly impossible without them.

This talk will take a fascinating multimedia look at the history and culture of the Irish of New York from their immigrant beginnings to the present day. Their journey of hope is reflected in the shared experiences of immigrants from around the world coming to America.

Tara Rider is the director of Stony Brook University’s international academic programs to both Ireland and England, where she seeks to introduce students to new cultures, ideas, and histories. She earned her Ph.D. in history from SUNY Stony Brook.

FREE. Reservations are required. Register Online.
NOTE LOCATION: Church of St. Brigid, which was built in 1848 by Irish immigrants for those fleeing the Great Famine, 119 Avenue B (SE corner of 8th Street)

Co-sponsored by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.
This Public Scholars event, which is free and open to the public, is made possible through the support of the New York Council for the Humanities, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Thursday, March 15, 5 to 8 p.m. (Guided tour at 6:30 p.m.)
A Toast to Bridget Murphy!
Join us for light refreshments (yes, green beer!) and a pre-St. Patrick’s Day back-stairs tour. You’ll climb the narrow staircase to the fourth-floor servants’ quarters and see where the Tredwells’ four Irish servants lived and did some of their work, “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in New York City” (Time Out New York).
Free with general Admission. Reservations are not required.

Friday, March 16, 6:30 & 7 p.m.
“Spirit of the Irish” Candlelight Ghost Tour
Includes the 4th Floor Servants’ Quarters!
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them. Many of the most peculiar occurrences have been related to the Tredwells’ Irish servants, and so this special tour will include the 4th floor Servants’ Quarters.
50 minutes. $40, $25 Members. SOLD OUT.

Saturday, March 17, Guided Tours at 12:30 p.m., 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m.
St. Patrick’s Day: A Tribute to the Tredwells’ Irish Servants with Bridget Murphy
Join us for a back-stairs tour and experience the Merchant’s House through the eyes of the Irish immigrants who worked as domestic servants for the Tredwell family. You’ll climb the narrow staircase to the fourth-floor servants’ quarters and see where the Tredwells’ four Irish servants lived and did some of their work, “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in New York City” (Time Out New York).  You’ll meet Tredwell servant Bridget Murphy, who will play traditional Irish airs on the harp and entertain guests with her singing. She’ll also tell you the many reasons why it would have been impossible to run a home like the Merchant’s House without her.
Included with General Admission. Reservations not required.

Saturday, March 24, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Behind-the-Ropes: Insider’s Tours of the Merchant’s House –
100 Years of Domestic Lighting
Join us for the second in a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll examine the evolution of 19th century domestic lighting and the story of technological advances and changing lifestyles it tells using examples throughout the Museum, including many not normally on exhibition.

We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen for coffee and a focused overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and its intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic and open locked doors … and more. From late Federal to Greek Revival; Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene, you’ll gain new insight and perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

About presenter Anthony Bellov: Bachelor of Architecture, Pratt Institute; graduate, Museum Leadership program, Bank Street College; certified New York State real estate instructor/lecturer; long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum, and an aficionado in 19th century American decorative arts and architecture.

Limited to 20 participants.
$30, $25 Members. Tickets available at the door.

APRIL EVENTS

Wednesday, April 4, 6:30 p.m.
Mind Reading and Mysticism at the Merchant’s House with Mentalist Kent Axell
Join renowned mentalist Kent Axell in the Tredwell family’s Greek Revival double parlor as he takes us back in time 150 years to experience mind reading, magic, and mystery.  In the mid-19th century, New Yorkers like the Tredwells hosted neighbors and friends in their home to showcase the latest in mysticism and psychic entertainments. Spiritualism, the belief that the living can talk to the dead, had become a phenomenon in 1848 thanks to the now-infamous Fox sisters and grew as a popular form of parlor entertainment. Whether he answers your sealed questions, reads your mind — or controls it — you’re guaranteed to feel the haunting touch of one of history’s most obscure, and awe-inspiring, art forms.
Capacity is very limited. $40, $50 VIP Seats (first two rows), $30 MHM Members.

Sunday, April 8, 12:30 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming walking tours: May 13, June 10, July 8.

Wednesday, April 11, 6:30 p.m.
Community Board 2 Public Hearing to Oppose the Development Next Door
A rezoning plan would allow construction of an oversized eight story/100 foot tall hotel next door to our 1832 landmark building. The Merchant’s House is fighting for its survival!
Please attend
and show your strong opposition.
And send a letter to the City Planing Commission and sign our petition.
Location: NYU Silver Building, 32 Waverly Place, Room 520

Wednesday, April 11, 6:30pm
An Illustrated Presentation in Word & Song:
The Bowery — Past, Present & Future on NYC’s Oldest Street:
Native American footpath, Dutch farm road, and site of NYC’s first free Black settlement, the Bowery stretches 1.25 miles from Chatham Square to Cooper Square. It was an early hub for the working class, gangs, gays, and immigrants. It has seminal links to dance, theater, baseball, streetcars, modern tattooing, Stephen Foster, Irving Berlin, Abe Lincoln, and Harry Houdini. In the 20th century, it helped launch Abstract Expressionism, Beat Literature, and punk rock. It is one of NYC’s most architecturally diverse streets, home to its oldest brick house and more. Now, it’s one of America’s most endangered historic streetscapes.

Program includes an illustrated talk by David Mulkins, vintage songs by Poor Baby Bree, and an interview with architectural historian Kerri Culhane, celebrating 5 years of the Bowery’s listing on the National Register of Historic Places

FREE.
NOTE LOCATION: Cooper Union’s Frederick P. Rose Auditorium, 41 Cooper Square (at 7th Street)
This event is fully accessible.
Co-sponsored by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, Bowery Alliance of Neighbors, and The Cooper Union.

Friday, April 20, 6:30 p.m. 
“April is the Cruellest Month” Candlelight Ghost Tour
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: May 18, June 15, July 20.

Saturday, April 28, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. SOLD OUT
Behind-the-Ropes: Insiders’ Tours of the Merchant’s House
Join us for the last in a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen for coffee and a focused overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and its intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic and open locked doors … and more. From late Federal to Greek Revival; Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene, you’ll gain new insight and perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

Changing Tastes in 19th Century Furniture
In the final tour of this series, we’ll discuss the finer points of the original Tredwell family collection of furniture and what it tells us about both the tastes and values of Antebellum New Yorkers and how growing international connections made lasting impact on design, trade, and international relations.

About presenter Anthony Bellov: Bachelor of Architecture, Pratt Institute; graduate, Museum Leadership program, Bank Street College; certified New York State real estate instructor/lecturer; long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum, and an aficionado in 19th century American decorative arts and architecture.

Limited to 20 participants.
$30, $25 Members. SOLD OUT! If you would like to be added to the wait list, email nyc1832@merchantshouse.org

MAY EVENTS

May 1 – May 30
Annual Lower East Side History Month
Festivals, Performances, gatherings, gardens & much more.
Calendar and info: peoplesles.org

Wednesday, May 2, 6:30 p.m.
Members Only Exhibition Preview & Tour
Tredwell Brides: Changing Wedding Traditions in the 19th Century
Reservations nyc1832@merchantshouse.org
Not a Member? Join here.

Thursday, May 3, through Monday, July 30
Exhibition –
Tredwell Brides: Changing Wedding Traditions in the 19th Century
Over the course of the 1800s, weddings in New York City evolved from intimate private ceremonies to large, lavish affairs. This exhibition explores the changes in wedding customs as the 19th century progressed, including the trousseau, printed invitations, and the giving of gifts. Highlights include Eliza Tredwell’s 1820 empire-style embroidered cotton wedding dress and Sarah Ann Tredwell’s 1872 silk bridal dress made in Paris, the highest fashion of the post-Civil War bustle period. Accessories include silk wedding boots, and earrings, corsage, and headpiece of wax orange blossoms. The Greek Revival parlor overflows with white flowers for the reenactment of the 1845 wedding of Elizabeth Tredwell and Effingham Nichols on June 9. (Scroll down for information and tickets.)
FREE with Admission    

Wednesday, May 9, 6:30 p.m.
Community Board 2 Public Hearing to Oppose the Development Next Door
A rezoning plan would allow construction of an oversized eight story/100 foot tall hotel next door to our 1832 landmark building. The Merchant’s House is fighting for its survival!
Please attend and show your strong opposition.
And send a letter to the City Planing Commission and sign our petition.
Location: Grace Church School, Tuttle Hall, 86 Fourth Avenue (11th Street)

Friday, May 11, 6:30 p.m.
Mind Reading and Mysticism at the Merchant’s House with Mentalist Kent Axell
Join renowned mentalist Kent Axell in the Tredwell family’s Greek Revival double parlor as he takes us back in time 150 years to experience mind reading, magic, and mystery.  In the mid-19th century, New Yorkers like the Tredwells hosted neighbors and friends in their home to showcase the latest in mysticism and psychic entertainments.

Spiritualism, the belief that the living can talk to the dead, had become a phenomenon in 1848 thanks to the now-infamous Fox sisters and grew as a popular form of parlor entertainment. Whether he answers your sealed questions, reads your mind — or controls it — you’re guaranteed to feel the haunting touch of one of history’s most obscure, and awe-inspiring, art forms.
Capacity is very limited. $40, $50 VIP Seats (first two rows), $30 MHM Members. Click here to purchase tickets.

Sunday, May 13, 12:30 p.m. (Mother’s Day)
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Invite Mom on
a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15; FREE for Members.
Upcoming walking tours: June 10, July 8.

Friday, May 18, 6:30 p.m. 
Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House”
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50 minutes. $30, $20 Members.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: June 15, July 20.

JUNE EVENTS

Saturday, June 2, 7:30 p.m. Due to circumstances beyond our control, the “Oh, Promise Me!” Concert has been POSTPONED. New date TBA.
Concert: “Oh, Promise Me!” – Songs of Love and Marriage
First comes love, then comes marriage … Wedding traditions blossomed in the 19th century when brides said “yes” to the white dress and “Here Comes the Bride” accompanied them down the aisle. Romantic songs such as “Oh, Promise Me!” brought poetry of Cupid and courtship to music salons and family parlors alike. Come hear the Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society sing songs that inspired passions through the 19th and early 20th centuries. Music by Wagner, Schumann, Brahms, Taubert, Léhar, Irving Berlin, and others.

Doors open at 7 p.m. for guests who wish to view the current exhibition, Tredwell Brides: Changing Wedding Traditions in the 19th Century, which features Eliza Tredwell’s 1820 empire-style embroidered cotton wedding dress and Sarah Ann Tredwell’s 1872 silk bridal dress made in Paris.

75 minutes. Very limited capacity.

Saturday, June 9, 6:30 to 8 p.m.
“Dearly Beloved:” 1845 Wedding Reenactment & Garden Reception
In the 19th century, American weddings gradually transformed from private, informal celebrations to elaborate and expensive spectacles. In mid-19th century New York City, many marriages took place at home. Join us in the museum’s Greek Revival double parlor as we discuss changing wedding customs in the 19th century, then recreate the 1845 wedding of the Tredwells’ oldest daughter, Elizabeth, and Effingham Nichols. After the ceremony, guests are invited to join the bride and groom in the garden for cake and light refreshments. 19th century attire is encouraged.

6 p.m., Exhibition viewingTredwell Brides: Changing Wedding Traditions in the 19th Century. Before the wedding ceremony, guests are invited to view the current exhibition, which features Eliza Tredwell’s 1820 empire-style embroidered cotton wedding dress and Sarah Ann Tredwell’s 1872 silk bridal dress made in Paris.
6:30 p.m., Wedding Ceremony
7 p.m., Reception in the Garden

$40, $55 VIP Seats, $25 MHM Members.
Reception only: $25, $15 for members.
VIP tickets include first-and-second row seating, wedding favors, and the opportunity to join the wedding party as a bridesmaid or groomsman.

Sunday, June 10, 12:30 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for
a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming walking tours: July 8, August 13, September 9, October 14, November 11.

Friday, June 15, 6:30 & 7 p.m. (SOLD OUT!) 
Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House”
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: July 20.