2017 Past Programs

2017 JANUARY EVENTS

NEW YEAR’S DAY, Sunday, January 1, 2 to 5 p.m.
‘Come Calling’ on New Year’s Day
Paying calls on friends and family on New Year’s Day was one of Old New York’s most cherished customs. Join us for tours of the house, 19th century readings about New Year’s Day celebrations, and punch and confectionery, as we continue the 19th century tradition of renewing, reviving, and reaffirming friendships. Holiday Raffle drawing at 4:30 p.m. “New York seemed to enjoy a general carnival. Broadway, from one end to the other, was alive with private carriages, omnibuses, cabs, and curricles, and lines of pedestrians fringed the carriageways.” From the Diary of Philip Hone, 1844. $20, $10 Members.

Through Monday, January 9 
Exhibition (opened Friday, November 25)
Christmas Comes to Old New York: Holiday Traditions of the Tredwell Family

Scenes of holiday preparation recreated in the period rooms throughout the house show how many of our modern holiday traditions originated in mid-19th century New York. From table-top Christmas trees decorated with candles and handmade ornaments, to poinsettias and evergreens decking the halls, Christmas songs and carols, presents and stockings. And, of course, Santa Claus. On display, rarely exhibited Christmas presents from the Tredwell collection.

Exhibition (opened Thursday, December 1)
Ch
arles Dickens Performs ‘A Christmas Carol’ in New York, December 1867 

In December 1867, Charles Dickens arrived in New York City for a month of sold-out performances of his beloved 1843 holiday classic, A Christmas Carol. Dickens performed at the 2,500 seat Steinway Hall on 14th Street, the center of cultural life in the city, and just a few blocks from the Tredwell home. And the critics raved: “The Christmas Carol becomes doubly enchanting when one hears it performed by Dickens.” (New York Herald, 1867)
Exhibition in conjunction with A CHRISTMAS CAROL at the MERCHANT’S HOUSE, December 6-24.
Guest curator, Dayle Vander Sande

Opens Thursday, January 19 
Exhibition –
Winter Warmth: How the Tredwells Bundled Up

Rarely seen objects from the original Tredwell collections are on display, including a foot stove, quilts, a muff,  hand-knit ‘joint warmers,’ and a crocheted capelette, all items the family used to (try to) keep warm during the cold winter months.  In the 19th century, there was no escaping the cold. Even with brisk fires burning, water froze in wash bowls, ink froze in wells, and wine in their bottles.  People did what little they could to keep the cold at bay, but interior temperatures in the 19th century were well below today’s standard 68 degrees.
Included with general admission.

Friday, January 20, 6:30 p.m.
Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times) SOLD OUT!
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them. “#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York, 2016)
50-60 minutes. $30, $20 Members.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: Friday, February 17, March 17, April 21, May 19, June 16, July 21.

Opens Saturday, January 21
Exhibition –
Tredwell Costume Collection:
One-piece Printed Cotton “Fancy Dress” Costume, 1885-1890, MHM 2002.0825

On display in Eliza Tredwell’s bedroom a “fancy dress” costume from the late 1880s. The gown is in imitation of an 18th century robe à la Française and consists of a printed cotton, sack-back gown (in which pleated fabric at the back of the dress falls loosely from the shoulders to the floor) and a peach-colored petticoat of moire taffeta. Cream-colored lace engageantes at the sleeve openings help complete the 18th century look.

In the 19th century, “fancy dress” costume balls were grand social affairs and were widely reported in the press. Guests dressed in very elaborate costumes and historical themes were most popular.
Included with general admission.

Thursday, January 19, through Monday, April 24
Winter Warmth: How the Tredwells Bundled Up

Rarely seen objects from the original Tredwell collections are on display, including a foot stove, quilts, a muff, hand-knit ‘joint warmers,’ and a crocheted capelette, all items the family used to (try to) keep warm during the cold winter months.  In the 19th century, there was no escaping the cold. Even with brisk fires burning, water froze in wash bowls, ink froze in wells, and wine in their bottles.  People did what little they could to keep the cold at bay, but interior temperatures in the 19th century were well below today’s standard 68 degrees.
Included with regular admission.

Saturday, January 21, through Monday, April 24
Tredwell Costume Collection:
One-piece Printed Cotton “Fancy Dress” Costume, 1885-1890, MHM 2002.0825
On display in Eliza Tredwell’s bedroom a “fancy dress” costume from the late 1880s. The gown is in imitation of an 18th century robe à la Française and consists of a printed cotton, sack-back gown (in which pleated fabric at the back of the dress falls loosely from the shoulders to the floor) and a peach-colored petticoat of moire taffeta. Cream-colored lace engageantes at the sleeve openings help complete the 18th century look.

In the 19th century, “fancy dress” costume balls were grand social affairs and were widely reported in the press. Guests dressed in very elaborate costumes and historical themes were most popular.
Included with general admission.

Saturday, January 28, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Behind-the-Ropes: Insider’s Tours of the Merchant’s House
First in a Series – Changing Tastes in 19th Century Furniture

Upcoming:
Saturday, February 25: 100 Years of Domestic Lighting
Saturday, March 25: The Architecture of an 1832 Landmark

Join us for a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll explore in detail the architecture of the 1832 Merchant’s House, one of only 117 buildings designated an interior and exterior landmark in New York, and examine the finer points of the original Tredwell family collection of furniture and domestic lighting.

We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen for coffee and an overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic. We’ll pull out drawers to show furniture construction details, remove shades of lamps to see the workings, open locked doors … and more. From Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene; late Federal to Greek Revival, you’ll gain new perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

About presenter Anthony Bellov: Bachelor’s in Architecture from Pratt Institute, Graduate in Museum Leadership from Bank Street College of Education, long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum and an aficionado in 19th Century American Decorative Arts and Architecture.

$30, $25 Members. Limited to 20 participants.
Click here to purchase tickets.

FEBRUARY EVENTS

Tuesday, February 7, 6 to 8 p.m.
Illustrated Lecture –
Stoops to Conquer: The Evolution of the New York Townhouse
With Richard Sammons, Fairfax & Sammons Architects
A collaboration with the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation
New York City in the popular imagination may be defined by the skyscraper, but in reality our city’s landscape is dominated by a grid plan that minced most blocks into a staggering number of narrow lots – easily bought, sold, and built on. The development of these small individual lots produced entire neighborhoods of narrow residential buildings, making the townhouse the true vernacular architecture of the city. Join architect Richard Sammons as he traces the origins and evolution of the ever-present townhouse in New York City. Townhouses give so many historic neighborhoods their charm, but what are the weaknesses of the form? And how can we as modern architects and city-dwellers improve on this classic architectural style to bring the economical, adaptable, and sustainable townhouse into the 21st century?

This event is free.
NOTE LOCATION: Salmagundi Club, 47 Fifth Avenue, at 12th Street
Reception, 6 p.m. – drinks available for purchase. Presentation, 6:30 p.m.
Tickets for this event are no longer available. Some seats may be available at the door on a first-come, first-served basis.
(This venue is not wheelchair accessible.)

Tuesday, February 14, 7 p.m.
Love in the Parlors: A Valentine in Concert  SOLD OUT!
The Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society presents lush, romantic vocal music of the world’s greatest 19th-century composers performed in the Museum’s Greek Revival double parlor. Singers Anthony Bellov, Amy Gluck, Jane Elizabeth Rady, and Dayle Vander Sande perform rarely heard gems by Beethoven, Schubert, Steven Foster, Amy Beach, and others.
Top pick for Valentine’s Day: NBC Online and TimeOut NY
75 minutes. $40, $30 Members.

Friday, February 17, 6:30 & 7 p.m. Both tours on 2/17 are SOLD OUT.
Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour
of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times)

Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them. “#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York, 2016)
50-60 minutes. $30, $20 Members.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: Friday, March 17, April 21, May 19, June 16, July 21.

Saturday, February 25, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Behind-the-Ropes: Insider’s Tours of the Merchant’s House
Second in a Series – 100 Years of Domestic Lighting
Upcoming:
Saturday, March 25: The Architecture of an 1832 Landmark

Join us for a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll explore in detail the architecture of the 1832 Merchant’s House, one of only 117 buildings designated an interior and exterior landmark in New York, and examine the finer points of the original Tredwell family collection of furniture and domestic lighting.

We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen (bring your own coffee; we’ll have pastries) for an overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic. We’ll pull out drawers to show furniture construction details, remove shades of lamps to see the workings, open locked doors … and more. From Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene; late Federal to Greek Revival, you’ll gain new perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

About presenter Anthony Bellov: Bachelor’s in Architecture from Pratt Institute, Graduate in Museum Leadership from Bank Street College of Education, long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum and an aficionado in 19th Century American Decorative Arts and Architecture.

$30, $25 Members. Limited to 20 participants.

Saturday, February 25, 3:30 p.m.
Interactive Tour for Families: A Child’s View of Life in 19th Century New York
29 East Fourth Street was home not only to the eight Tredwell children, but also to two young granddaughters. Come tour the house and learn what life was like for children (and adults) in the 1850s, from schoolwork and chores to games and play. Could you carry a bucket of coal up steep stairs? Do you have a calling card? A top hat? What, no hoop skirt? How did you take a bath? And penmanship really, really mattered.
Best for children 8 to 12 years old. $20, one adult, one child. $25, one adult, two children (max.).
Reservations not required.

MARCH EVENTS

Sunday, March 12, 12:30 p.m.
Second Sunday Walking Tours resume!

A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$10. FREE for Members. Reservations not required.

Friday, March 17, Guided Tours at 12:30 p.m., 2 p.m. & 3:30 p.m.
St. Patrick’s Day: A Tribute to the Tredwells’ Irish Servants with Bridget Murphy
Join us for a back-stairs tour and experience the Merchant’s House through the eyes of the Irish immigrants who worked as domestic servants for the Tredwell family. You’ll climb the narrow staircase to the fourth-floor servants’ quarters and see where the Tredwells’ four Irish servants lived and did some of their work, “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in New York City” (Time Out New York). What did the servants do on their day off? Where did they shop? Go to church? How did they find employment when they first arrived? Learn why it would have been impossible to run a home like the Merchant’s House without them.
Included with General Admission. Reservations not required.

Friday, March 17, 6:30 & 7 p.m. Both Tours SOLD OUT
“Spirit of the Irish” Candlelight Ghost Tour
Includes the 4th Floor Servants’ Quarters!
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them. Many of the most peculiar occurrences have been related to the Tredwells’ Irish servants, and so this special tour will include the 4th floor Servants’ Quarters.
50 minutes. $35, $25 Members.

Saturday, March 25, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. SOLD OUT!
Behind-the-Ropes: Insider’s Tours of the Merchant’s House
Third in a Series – The Architecture of an 1832 Landmark
Join us for a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll explore in detail the architecture of the 1832 Merchant’s House, one of only 117 buildings designated an interior and exterior landmark in New York, and examine the finer points of the original Tredwell family collection of furniture and domestic lighting.

We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen (bring your own coffee; we’ll have pastries) for an overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic. We’ll pull out drawers to show furniture construction details, remove shades of lamps to see the workings, open locked doors … and more. From Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene; late Federal to Greek Revival, you’ll gain new perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

About presenter Anthony Bellov: Bachelor’s in Architecture from Pratt Institute, Graduate in Museum Leadership from Bank Street College of Education, long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum and an aficionado in 19th Century American Decorative Arts and Architecture.

$30, $25 Members. Limited to 20 participants.

APRIL EVENTS

Thursday, April 27, through Monday, July 17
Exhibition – The Changing Silhouette of 19th Century Fashion: The Decade of the 1820s
Eliza Tredwell’s Wedding Dress, ca. 1820
The Tredwell Costume Collection comprises more than 400 articles of clothing. The core of the collection consists of 39 dresses documented to have been owned and worn by the women of the family. This month marks the beginning of a changing exhibition featuring Tredwell dresses from the decades of the 19th century. These dresses show the changing silhouette of fashion over 100 years, and tell us about the women who wore them and the society in which they lived. 

The first in the series is a white cotton, empire-style dress, ca. 1820, belonging to Eliza Tredwell. It was her wedding dress when she married Seabury Tredwell on June 13, 1820. It is the earliest dress in the Museum’s collection.

At the turn of the 19th century, amid vast political and philosophical changes taking place throughout Europe and America, women’s fashion also underwent a revolution. In place of the stiff stays, whalebone panniers, and silk brocade that characterized the last quarter of the 18th century, fashionable ladies adopted flowing columnar styles – often in fine, nearly transparent, white cotton to imitate marble – inspired by classical statues. For the first time in centuries, the new styles revealed nearly every line of the female form. While many undergarments (petticoats and other structured skirt supports, for example) were necessarily discarded during this period, most women continued to wear some form of stays, or corset, designed to smooth and elongate the body while lifting and separating the bosom.

Sunday, April 9, 12:30 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$10. FREE for Members. Reservations not required.
Next walking tour: Sunday, May 14 (Mother’s Day.)

Tuesday, April 11, 6:30 p.m.
Illustrated Lecture –
At the Tredwells’ Table: Culinary Customs of Mid-19th Century New York
Join professional chef and culinary historian Carl Raymond for a unique talk on the culinary customs of mid-19th century New York, including favorite foods, cooking methods, dining etiquette and service for an elegant dinner party, and entertaining. You’ll learn about nearby Tompkins Market, where the Tredwells bought their favorite foods (including take out); how the American kitchen and cooking techniques have evolved over time; and the family’s elaborate entertainments in the double parlor, including the famous New Year’s Day “calling.” Mr. Raymond will also discuss the influential cookbook writers and cookbooks of the mid-19th century and the lives of the Irish servants who lived in the Tredwells’ home and cooked and served their meals.
$20, $15 Members; click here to purchase tickets.

Saturday, April 15, 3:30 p.m.
Interactive Tour for Families: A Child’s View of Life in 19th Century New York
29 East Fourth Street was home not only to the eight Tredwell children, but also to two young granddaughters. Come tour the house and learn what life was like for children (and adults) in the 1850s, from schoolwork and chores to games and play. Could you carry a bucket of coal up steep stairs? Do you have a calling card? A top hat? What, no hoop skirt? How did you take a bath? And penmanship really, really mattered.
Best for children 8 to 12 years old. $20, one adult, one child. $25, one adult, two children (max.).
Reservations not required.

Friday, April 21, 6:30 p.m.  SOLD OUT! Email programs@merchantshouse.org to be placed on a wait list.
“April is the Cruellest Month” Candlelight Ghost Tour
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Upcoming Ghost Tours: May 19, June 16.

Thursday, April 27, thorough Monday, September 25
When Women’s Work Was Needlework

Like other women of their class, Eliza Tredwell and her daughters were adept at plain, and fancy, sewing, much of which was accomplished together with female friends and relatives.

The Merchant’s House Museum costume and textile collections include hand-crafted, as well as mass-produced items. This exhibition focuses on examples likely have been made by the inhabitants of this household, including embroidery, knit and crochet doilies, and other textiles made by hand. Tredwell needlework tools will also be on display.

Thursday, April 6, through Monday, September 25
“With All the Frills Upon It:” Hats from the Tredwell Collection
In the 19th century, millinery was an art and the hat the focal point of every fashionable ensemble. A collection of hats worn by the Tredwell women will be on display, perhaps some adorned for Fifth Avenue’s Easter Parade, which began in the 1880s. Hats of silk, felt, straw, and horsehair, adorned with feathers, lace, ribbons and beads, evoke an era when women never left home without it – their hat that is. And they frequently wore head covering indoors, as well.

MAY EVENTS

May 1 – May 30
4th Annual Lower East Side History Month
Click here for info & events.

Sunday, May 14, 12:30 p.m. 
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15, FREE for Members; click here to purchase tickets. Next walking tour: Sunday, June 11.

Friday, May 19, 6:30 p.m. SOLD OUT
Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House.” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Upcoming Ghost Tours: June 16, July 21.

JUNE EVENTS

Thursday, until 8 p.m., June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
Summer Evenings in the Garden
Enjoy a glass of wine in our “secret” 19th century garden in bloom

Guided Tour, 6:30 p.m. Light Refreshments. Rain or Shine.
Admission $15, $10 Students & Seniors, FREE for Members.
Reservations not required.

Friday, June 9, 6:30 p.m.
Open Mic Nite in the Garden
In the 19th century, literary salons gathered great thinkers, artists, and writers under one roof for a night of socialization and “improving conversation.” In that same spirit, the Merchant’s House celebrates the works of today’s new writers, performance artists, and musicians. Come to share your work or simply enjoy the garden all abloom. Wine & light refreshments will be served.
If you’d like to perform, please bring no more than 5 minutes of material; sign-up available upon entry.
Admission $10, Students & Seniors $5, FREE for Members.
Upcoming Open Mic Nites: July 14, August 18, September 15

Sunday, June 11, 12:30 p.m. 
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15, FREE for Members; click here to purchase tickets.
Next walking tour: Sunday, July 9.

Tuesday, June 13, 6 to 8 p.m.
Illustrated Talk & Workshop:
Genealogy 101 – Introduction to Family History Research with Richard Fipphen
Reception in the Garden Follows

“Genealogy is the second most popular hobby in the U.S. … and the second most visited category of websites. It’s a billion-dollar industry …” (TIME magazine)

Are you interested in researching your family history – but maybe a little overwhelmed and not sure even where to begin? This presentation will cover several topics on getting started with your research, including: where to find records of your ancestors, whether in libraries, courthouses, archives — or online; interpreting research data; and proving ancestral connections. Tips on using online databases will also be discussed. After the presentation, Rich will answer questions and continue the discussion over refreshments in the garden. You’ll leave with a packet of material to help get you started on your journey.

This talk on the fundamentals of genealogical research will be centered around the ancestry of Gertrude Tredwell (1840-1933). Gertrude was the descendant of early Massachusetts settlers, including Mayflower passengers John Alden and Priscilla Mullins.

$15, $10 Members; click here to purchase tickets.

Richard Fipphen has been a genealogist since 1975. He is the co-author of the Phippen Genealogy: Descendants of David Phippen (c.1585-1650) of Melcombe Regis, Dorset and Hingham and Boston, Massachusetts, Newbury Street Press, Boston (Spring 2017). He is a member of the New England Historic Genealogical Society in Boston, and the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society in New York City. He is also a graduate of the Genealogical Research Certificate Program at Boston University. Rich is also a Merchant’s House Museum docent and a distant cousin of Seabury Tredwell.

Friday, June 16, 6:30 p.m.
Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House.” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50 minutes. $30, $20 Members; click here to purchase tickets. Upcoming Ghost Tours: July 21.

Tuesday, June 20, 6:30 p.m.
The Garden in June Bloom: Color, Form & Function
Members Only Tour and Reception
Click here to become a member for an invitation to this
exclusive evening with Head Gardener John Rommel.

JULY EVENTS

Thursday, until 8 p.m., July 6, 13, 20, 27
Summer Evenings in the Garden
Enjoy a glass of wine in our “secret” 19th century garden in bloom
Guided Tour, 6:30 p.m. Light Refreshments. Rain or Shine.
Admission $15, $10 Students & Seniors, FREE for Members.
Reservations not required.

Sunday, July 9, 12:30 p.m. 
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15, FREE for Members; click here to purchase tickets.
Next walking tour: Sunday, August 13

Friday, July 14, 6:30 p.m.
Open Mic Nite in the Garden
In the 19th century, literary salons gathered great thinkers, artists, and writers under one roof for a night of socialization and “improving conversation.” In that same spirit, the Merchant’s House celebrates the works of today’s new writers, performance artists, and musicians. Come to share your work or simply enjoy the garden all abloom. Wine & light refreshments will be served.
If you’d like to perform, please bring no more than 5 minutes of material; sign-up available upon entry.
Admission $10, Students & Seniors $5, FREE for Members.
Upcoming Open Mic Nites: August 18, September 15

Thursday, July 20, through September 25
The Changing Silhouette of 19th Century Fashion: The Decade of the 1830s
Day Dress, 1830-1835
The Tredwell Costume Collection comprises more than 400 articles of clothing. The core of the collection consists of 39 dresses documented to have been owned and worn by the women of the family. The Changing Silhouette of 19th Century Fashion is a changing exhibition featuring Tredwell dresses from the decades of the 19th century. These dresses show the changing silhouette of fashion over 100 years, and tell us about the women who wore them and the society in which they lived.

The 1830s heralded a dramatic shift in fashion from the Empire style popular in the 18th century. The Empire style, which became fashionable after the French Revolution, favored simple lines and a high waistline, resulting in a straight, narrow silhouette. By 1830, a new silhouette appeared with wider shoulders, larger sleeves, and a fuller skirt. The early part of the decade was characterized by exaggerated elements of dress, for example, enormous sleeves and wider necklines and became more subdued as the decade progressed.

Second in the series is a white linen day dress with large leg-o-mutton sleeves and a full, gathered skirt. Intended for wear during the day, this dress would have been worn with a chemisette to fill in the low neckline. With its tiny waistband measuring 21 inches, the dress was no doubt made for a young, or very slender, woman.

Friday, July 21, 6:30 p.m. & 7 p.m. 
Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House.” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
Next Ghost Tours October 20, 21, 26-30.
50 minutes. $30, $20 Members.

AUGUST EVENTS

Sunday, August 13, 12:30 p.m. 
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15, FREE for Members; click here to purchase tickets. Next walking tour: Sunday, September 10.

SEPTEMBER EVENTS

Thursday, until 8 p.m., September 7, 14, 21, 28
Summer Evenings in the Garden
Enjoy a glass of wine in our “secret” 19th century garden in bloom
Guided Tour, 6:30 p.m. Light Refreshments. Rain or Shine.
Admission $15, $10 Students & Seniors, FREE for Members.
Reservations not required.

Sunday, September 10, 12:30 p.m. 
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15, FREE for Members; click here to purchase tickets. Next walking tour: Sunday, September 10.

Friday, September 15, 6:30 p.m.
Open Mic Nite in the Garden
In the 19th century, literary salons gathered great thinkers, artists, and writers under one roof for a night of socialization and “improving conversation.” In that same spirit, the Merchant’s House celebrates the works of today’s new writers, performance artists, and musicians. Come to share your work or simply enjoy the garden all abloom. Wine & light refreshments will be served.
If you’d like to perform, please bring no more than 5 minutes of material; sign-up available upon entry.
Admission $10, Students & Seniors $5, FREE for Members.

Wednesday, September 20, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Benefit in the Garden: A CALL TO ARMS
Please join us for cocktails and wines, hors d’oeuvres, tours of the house, and music in our 19th century garden.
We need your support! This is our last chance to stop the development next door.
All proceeds will go to paying for legal and engineering expenses to defeat the developers’ application for special permits to build an eight-story hotel adjacent to the 185-year-old landmark (inside and out) Merchant’s House.
Host Sponsor: Fairfax & Sammons Architects
Click here to purchase tickets. 

Saturday, September 30, 6:30 p.m.
Documentary Film Screening and Discussion –
In the Parlor: The Final Goodbye
In the 19th century, death was an integral and accepted part of life for families like the Tredwells, who held funerals for eight family members in their double parlor. When patriarch Seabury Tredwell died at home, in 1865, his wife, Eliza, and their children prepared and dressed the body for viewing and for burial, likely assisted by a “layer out of the dead” or an undertaker. With the rise of industrial society came the professional funeral director, who removed death care from the home.

In the Parlor: The Final Goodbye is both a critical look at America’s uncomfortable relationship with death and an inquiry into the growing revival of home death-care. The film takes viewers on an intimate journey into the lives of three families who have chosen to reclaim an active role in caring for their deceased as a more personal and fulfilling way to say goodbye. The film challenges us to reflect on how we view the experience of death, so often feared, denied, and left unspoken.

Heidi Boucher, filmmaker and home death care guide for over 30 years, wrote, directed, and produced In the Parlor: The Final Goodbye. A discussion will follow the screening (running time: 80 minutes).
$20, Members FREE

OCTOBER EVENTS

Wednesday, October 4, 6:30 p.m.
Members Only Exhibition Preview: “Truly We Live in a Dying World:” A 19th Century Home in Mourning

Thursday, October 5, through Monday, October 30 
Exhibition –
“Truly We Live in a Dying World:” A 19th Century Home in Mourning

Including rarely exhibited items of Tredwell family mourning dress and accessories from the collection.
Step back in time to 1865, when family patriarch Seabury Tredwell died at home in his second floor bedroom. Poignant scenes of death and grief recreated in the House will explore mid-19th century mourning customs. Pay your last respects at his deathbed upstairs, or join the mourning in the double parlor, hung with black crepe and set for a mid-19th century funeral. And stage your own “postmortem” photograph in our 19th century coffin. Then share with your friends on Instagram and Twitter #mhmcoffin2017.

Also on exhibit, Tredwell family photographs and mourning attire and accessories, including jewelry made of hair and jet, a black net veil, several bodices and shawls, and two 1870s mourning gowns. 
Included with regular admission; reservations not required.

Sunday, October 8, 12:30 p.m. 
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15, FREE for Members; click here to purchase tickets. Next walking tour: Sunday, November 12.

Friday, October 13, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Mind Reading and Mysticism at the Merchant’s House (on the Unluckiest of Days)
With Mentalist Kent Axell
The year is 1865: the Civil War ends, Lincoln is assassinated, and the Tredwell family is in deep mourning after the death of patriarch Seabury Tredwell. These uneasy times fueled wide-spread belief in mysticism and the supernatural and wealthy New Yorkers like the Tredwells hosted neighbors and friends to showcase the latest in psychic entertainments. We invite you to join renowned mentalist Kent Axell in the family’s Greek Revival double parlor as he takes us back in time to experience mind reading, magic, and mystery. Whether he answers your sealed questions, reads your mind — or controls it — you’re guaranteed to feel the haunting touch of one of history’s most obscure, and awe-inspiring, art forms.
A reception with Mr. Axell follows.
$30, $40 VIP Seats, $20 MHM Members. SOLD OUT.

Sunday, October 15, 4 to 5:30 p.m. 
From Parlor to Grave: 1865 Funeral Reenactment and Graveyard Procession
In the 19th century, death and funerals took place at home. Join us in the Museum’s double parlor as we recreate the 1865 funeral service of Seabury Tredwell and discuss the funerary customs of 19th century New York City. After the service, mourners follow the coffin to nearby New York City Marble Cemetery – rarely open to the public – for the graveside service and cemetery talk. 19th century mourning attire is encouraged.

New this year! Before the service, mourners may pay their last respects at Seabury Tredwell’s deathbed upstairs, view rarely-exhibited mourning accessories from the Tredwell collection — and take a “postmortem” photograph in a 19th century coffin #MHMcoffin2017.

VIP tickets include front-row seating, black armbands (and the opportunity to lead the graveyard procession as a pallbearer).
$40, $55 VIP Seats, $25 MHM Members.

Wednesday, October 18, 7 p.m.
Chant Macabre: Songs from the Crypt
Ghosts, ghouls, and goblins haunt the lyrics of the 19th century. Come be spooked by these harrowing tales as the Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society bewitches your imagination and sings shivers down your spine, echoing sumptuous, rarely performed songs in an authentic period parlor. Singers Anthony Bellov, Amy Gluck, Jane Elizabeth Rady, and Dayle Vander Sande. Music by Schubert, Liszt, Debussy, Duparc, Loewe, Mussorgsky, Humperdinck, and others.
75 minutes. $30, $20 MHM Members. Limited capacity.

Friday, October 20 & Saturday, October 21
Thursday, October 26 to Monday, October 30
Candlelight Ghost Tours
Of ‘Manhattan’s Most Haunted House’ (The New York Times)

Updated with the latest eerie happenings! Seven family members died in the house; their funerals were held in the front parlor hung with black crepe. We invite you to venture into the dark and ghostly shadows of history by flickering candlelight to hear chilling tales of restless phantoms, voices calling into the night, and otherworldly occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
New this year! ALL tours include 4th Floor Servants’ Quarters!
50-minute tours begin every half hour from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Click here to purchase tickets.

Tuesday, October 31, 6:30 & 8 p.m.
Tales from the Crypt: Horror on Hallowe’en
Patriarch Seabury Tredwell has died. His coffin sits in the front parlor surrounded by lilies and flickering candles; black crepe covers the mirrors. Join us for dramatic readings from the darkest of 19th Gothic literature and true ghost stories of the unsettling and unexplainable as reported by museum visitors.
$25, $15 MHM Members. Limited capacity.

NOVEMBER EVENTS

Thursday, November 2, through Monday, January  8
Exhibition –
Charles Dickens Performs ‘A Christmas Carol’ in New York, December 1867
In December 1867, Charles Dickens arrived in New York City for a month of sold-out performances of his beloved 1843 holiday classic, A Christmas Carol. Dickens performed at the 2,500 seat Steinway Hall on 14th Street, the center of cultural life in the city, and just a few blocks from the Tredwell home. And the critics raved: “The Christmas Carol becomes doubly enchanting when one hears it performed by Dickens.” (New York Herald, 1867)

Exhibition in conjunction with A CHRISTMAS CAROL at the MERCHANT’S HOUSE, Charles Dickens in New York, 1867
Starring John Kevin Jones as Mr. Dickens. 

Limited run, November 30 – December 31.  Click here for tickets and for more information.

Wednesday, November 8, 6:30 p.m. POSTPONED
“Straight from My Heart to Thine:” A Reading of 19th Century Letters of Condolence
With death ever-present, condolence letters were mainstays of 19th century life, missives of comfort written straight from the heart. Join us in the Tredwells’ Greek Revival double parlor (where eight family funerals took place) for a reading of letters by Thomas Carlyle, Walt Whitman, Charles Dickens, Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Abraham Lincoln, and Queen Victoria herself. Funeral director Amy Cunningham will lead a discussion of modern condolence letter writing following the reading. “Mourning biscuits,” a staple of 19th century funerals, and light fare will be served in our 1850s kitchen.

Amy Cunningham is a Brooklyn funeral director who helps families with green burials, cremation services in Green-Wood Cemetery’s crematory chapels, home vigils, and other sorts of memorials. Her blog, where she discusses these topics, can be found at TheInspiredFuneral.com
$15; Members $10. Limited capacity. Click here to purchase tickets.

Friday, November 10, 6:30 p.m.
Mind Reading and Mysticism at the Merchant’s House with Mentalist Kent Axell
In the mid 19th century, New Yorkers, like the Tredwells, hosted neighbors and friends in their home to showcase the latest in mysticism and psychic entertainments. Spiritualism, which had become a phenomenon in 1848 thanks to the now-infamous Fox sisters, peaked in popularity in the years immediately after the Civil War. It is certainly no wonder: the loss of life was massive, spurring believers and skeptics alike to turn to Spiritualism — the belief that the living can talk to the dead — as one last chance for contact with a loved one, lost too soon.

In addition to providing comfort to the bereaved, Spiritualism grew as a popular form of parlor entertainment. We invite you to join renowned mentalist Kent Axell in the family’s Greek Revival double parlor as he takes us back in time 150 years to experience mind reading, magic, and mystery. Whether he answers your sealed questions, reads your mind — or controls it — you’re guaranteed to feel the haunting touch of one of history’s most obscure, and awe-inspiring, art forms.
Capacity is very limited. 
$40, $50 VIP Seats, $30 MHM Members. Click here to purchase tickets.

Sunday, November 12, 12:30 p.m. (Last of the Year! Walking Tours resume in March)
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos — and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House. You’ll walk the footsteps of these wealthy mercantile families whose elegant Federal mansions once lined the tranquil cobblestone streets. Our tour passes by iconic landmarks such as the imposing Colonnade Row, the Public Theater, and The Cooper Union, where Lincoln gave his ‘right makes might’ speech. On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the scandalous 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes.
$15, FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets.

NOTE: Tours are one hour and begin promptly.
Tours are canceled in the case of heavy rain, snow, or extreme heat and cold advisories.

Friday, November 17, 6:30 & 7p.m. SOLD OUT
Pre-Thanksgiving Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House”
Haunted by the prospect of your relatives at Thanksgiving? Join us on a Candlelight Ghost Tour to get in the mood. Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died (and The New York Times called “Manhattan’s Most Haunted”) by flickering candlelight and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
50 minutes. $30, $25 Members.

“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York, 2015 & 2016)

Friday, November 24, through Monday, January 8
Exhibition –
Christmas Comes to Old New York: Holiday Traditions of the Tredwell Family

Scenes of holiday preparation recreated in the period rooms throughout the house show how many of our modern holiday traditions originated in mid-19th century New York. From table-top Christmas trees decorated with candles and handmade ornaments, to poinsettias and evergreens decking the halls, Christmas songs and carols, presents and stockings. And, of course, Santa Claus. On display, rarely exhibited Christmas presents from the Tredwell collection.
Free with museum admission.

Monday, November 27, 6:30 p.m.
Illustrated Talk –
A New York Christmas: Ho-Ho-Ho at Gothamtide!

Join New York City cultural historian Sibyl Groff (also affectionately known as Queen Santa and Lady Gothamtide) as she explores the magic and hidden treasures of the holidays in the City. In this lively talk, filled with anecdotes, you’ll learn about the 19th century beginnings of the traditions we celebrate today and how New York, a melting pot of diverse cultures, became the “Christmas capital.”

Her new guide book, A New York Christmas: Ho-Ho-Ho at Gothamtide!, is packed with remembrances and recommendations for all New York has to offer during the holidays, including many special secrets. Yes, Queen Santa says a visit to the Merchant’s House is “a must!” The book will be available for purchase.

$20, $10 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.

DECEMBER EVENTS

Celebrating 100 Years on Lower Fifth Avenue: The Salmagundi Club, 1917-2017
Holiday Open House, 
Sunday, December 10, 2 to 6 p.m.
47 Fifth Avenue (at 12th Street)

Have you ever wondered what goes on behind the elegant brownstone facade of 47 Fifth Avenue, built in 1853 for wealthy coal merchant Irad Hawley?  This year, the Salmagundi Club, founded in 1871 and one of the oldest art organizations in the country, marks 100 years in this landmark double-wide house. You are invited to venture up the high stoop for the club’s first-ever Open House. Enjoy food, drink, music, festive holiday decorations – and good company. Explore the club’s three art galleries, wood-paneled library, the Hawley’s original 19th-century dressing rooms, the vintage bar, and the double parlor with its exquisite ornamental plaster work. View historic artists’ palettes and mugs (featured on Antiques Roadshow), the club’s 22 fireplaces, as well as the historic Thumb Box Show, comprised of hundreds of small paintings by some of today’s prominent realist painters. Discover hidden original details rarely on view. Docents will be stationed throughout the house, offering unique insights into the history of this Village institution.

Free. RSVP required.
Co-sponsored by the Salmagundi Club and the Greenwich Village Society of Historic Preservation.
This event is not fully accessible.