Calendar of Events

MUSEUM HOURS
Thursday, 12 to 8 p.m. (January – September), 12 to 5 p.m. (October – December)
Friday – Monday, 12 to 5 p.m.
(Closed Tuesday, Wednesday, and major holidays.)

GUIDED HOUSE TOURS
Thursday, 2 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. (January – September)
Friday – Monday, 2 p.m.
A Self-Guided Tour Booklet is available for those who wish to tour the house at their own pace.

CANDLELIGHT GHOST TOURS
Third Friday of the month, January – July, and November

WALKING TOURS OF 19TH CENTURY NOHO
Second and Fourth Sunday of the month, March – November

EVENTS & EXHIBITIONS

FEBRUARY

Through Monday, April 15
Exhibition: “Finest Surviving:” Ornamental Plaster Work at the Merchant’s House Museum
The 1832 Merchant’s House is distinguished as one of only 120 interior landmarks in New York City. Its intact original ornamental plaster work is considered the “finest surviving” from the period. Learn how the plaster walls, ceilings, and ornamentation in the Merchant’s House were created in the 19th century. On display, original 1832 plaster fragments and molds and plaster casts created by sculptor and ornamental plasterer David Flaharty, who used the same methods as the early 19th century artisans during a house-wide restoration in the 1970s. Included with General Admission.

Friday, February 15, 6:30 p.m. 
Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50-60 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: Friday, March 15, April 19, May 17, June 21, July 19.

The Museum will be OPEN on President’s Day, Monday, February 18, from 12 to 5 p.m.

Thursday, February 21, through Monday, May 20
Exhibition: The Changing Silhouette of Fashion: The Decade of the 1890s
Day Dress, MHM 2002.0830

The Tredwell Costume Collection comprises more than 400 articles of clothing. The core of the collection consists of 39 dresses documented to have been owned by the women of the family. The Changing Silhouette of Fashion is a changing exhibition featuring Tredwell dresses from each decade of the 19th and early 20th centuries. These dresses show the changing silhouette of fashion over 100 years, and tell us about the women who wore them and the society in which they lived.

Next in the series is a two-piece cotton day dress from the early 1890s. The dress has leg-of-mutton sleeves, which was one of the defining characteristics of ladies fashion during this decade. It also features an even-length hem with no train, making it a more practical option for outdoor activities, such as walking, visiting friends, or shopping. Included with general admission.

Saturday, February 23, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Behind-the-Ropes: Insider’s Tours of the Merchant’s House
Second in a Series – Changing Tastes in 19th Century Furniture

Next up: Saturday, March 30: 100 Years of Domestic Lighting
Join us for a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll explore in detail the architecture of the 1832 Merchant’s House, one of only 120 buildings designated an interior and exterior landmark in New York, and examine the finer points of the original Tredwell family collection of furniture and domestic lighting.

We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen (bring your own coffee) for an overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic. We’ll pull out drawers to show furniture construction details, remove shades of lamps to see the workings, open locked doors … and more. From late Federal to Greek Revival, Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene, you’ll gain new perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

Anthony Bellov: Bachelor’s in Architecture from Pratt Institute, Graduate in Museum Leadership from Bank Street College of Education, long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum and an aficionado in 19th Century American Decorative Arts and Architecture.

$30, $25 Members. Limited to 20 participants. Click here to purchase tickets.

MARCH

Through Monday, April 15
Exhibition: “Finest Surviving:” Ornamental Plaster Work at the Merchant’s House Museum
The 1832 Merchant’s House is distinguished as one of only 120 interior landmarks in New York City. Its intact original ornamental plaster work is considered the “finest surviving” from the period. Learn how the plaster walls, ceilings, and ornamentation in the Merchant’s House were created in the 19th century. On display, original 1832 plaster fragments and molds and plaster casts created by sculptor and ornamental plasterer David Flaharty, who used the same methods as the early 19th century artisans during a house-wide restoration in the 1970s. Included with General Admission.

Through Monday, May 20
Exhibition: The Changing Silhouette of Fashion: The Decade of the 1890s
Day Dress, MHM 2002.0830

The Tredwell Costume Collection comprises more than 400 articles of clothing. The core of the collection consists of 39 dresses documented to have been owned by the women of the family. The Changing Silhouette of Fashion is a changing exhibition featuring Tredwell dresses from each decade of the 19th and early 20th centuries. These dresses show the changing silhouette of fashion over 100 years, and tell us about the women who wore them and the society in which they lived.

Next in the series is a two-piece cotton day dress from the early 1890s. The dress has leg-of-mutton sleeves, which was one of the defining characteristics of ladies fashion during this decade. It also features an even-length hem with no train, making it a more practical option for outdoor activities, such as walking, visiting friends, or shopping. Included with general admission.

Sunday, March 10, 12:30 p.m.
Second and Fourth Sunday Walking Tours resume!

In the Footsteps of Bridget Murphy: A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho 
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

In this special walking tour, we’ll explore the world of Irish immigrants, who flooded into New York City in the 19th century to escape famine and hardship in Ireland; in 1855, approximately 24,000 Irish immigrants worked as servants for wealthy families like the Tredwells. We’ll explore the world of these immigrants and see sites associated with a servant’s life outside the walls of her employer’s home.

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Next walking tours: March 24; April 14, 28; May 12, 26; June 9, 23; July 14, 28.

Friday, March 15, 6:30 & 7 p.m. 
“Spirit of the Irish” Candlelight Ghost Tour
Includes the 4th Floor Servants’ Quarters!
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them. Many of the most peculiar occurrences have been related to the Tredwells’ Irish servants, and so this special tour will include the 4th floor Servants’ Quarters.
50 minutes. $40, $25 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.

Sunday, March 17, Guided Tours at 12:30 p.m., 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m.
St. Patrick’s Day: A Tribute to the Tredwells’ Irish Servants with Bridget Murphy
Join us for a back-stairs tour and experience the Merchant’s House through the eyes of the Irish immigrants who worked as domestic servants for the Tredwell family. You’ll climb the narrow staircase to the fourth-floor servants’ quarters and see where the Tredwells’ four Irish servants lived and did some of their work, “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in New York City” (Time Out New York).  You’ll meet Tredwell servant Bridget Murphy, who will play traditional Irish airs on the harp and entertain guests with her singing. She’ll also tell you the many reasons why it would have been impossible to run a home like the Merchant’s House without her.
Included with General Admission. Reservations not required.

Tuesday, March 19, 6:30 p.m.
Illustrated Talk
The NEW New York: 19th Century Irish Immigration and the Revolution

This talk will look at archbishops, saints-in-waiting, gangsters, rogues, jesters and other colorful characters. There will be a special emphasis on “Fenian New York,” a refuge for Irish revolutionaries since the failed Rising of 1867.

In Fenian New York you’ll meet the likes of John Devoy, Jeremiah O’Donovan Rossa, 1916 martyr Thomas Clarke (the only American citizen executed by the British in 1916), and Sir Roger Casement, who since his death has not only become a patriot but a gay icon. It should also be remembered that Eamon de Valera, President of Ireland, was born in New York in 1882 and spent several crucial years in New York between 1919-20.

Dermot McEvoy is the author of six books including the novels, The 13th Apostle: a Novel of Michael Collins and the Irish Uprising, Our Lady of Greenwich Village, and the forthcoming True Tales of Irish New York. He is a frequent contributor to IrishCentral.com where he writes on history, politics, and culture.

NOTE LOCATION: 6th Street Community Center, 638 East 6th Street
FREE. Click here for reservations. This event is fully accessible.

Presented in partnership with the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation

Sunday, March 24, 12:30 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming walking tours: April 14, 28; May 12, 26; June 9, 23; July 14, 28.

Saturday, March 30, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Behind-the-Ropes: Insider’s Tours of the Merchant’s House
Third in a Series – 100 Years of Domestic Lighting
Join us for a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll explore in detail the architecture of the 1832 Merchant’s House, one of only 120 buildings designated an interior and exterior landmark in New York, and examine the finer points of the original Tredwell family collection of furniture and domestic lighting.

We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen (bring your own coffee) for an overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic. We’ll pull out drawers to show furniture construction details, remove shades of lamps to see the workings, open locked doors … and more. From Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene; late Federal to Greek Revival, you’ll gain new perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

About presenter Anthony Bellov: Bachelor’s in Architecture from Pratt Institute, Graduate in Museum Leadership from Bank Street College of Education, long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum and an aficionado in 19th Century American Decorative Arts and Architecture.

$30, $25 Members. Limited to 20 participants. Click here to purchase tickets.

APRIL

Through Monday, April 15
Exhibition: “Finest Surviving:” Ornamental Plaster Work at the Merchant’s House Museum
The 1832 Merchant’s House is distinguished as one of only 120 interior landmarks in New York City. Its intact original ornamental plaster work is considered the “finest surviving” from the period. Learn how the plaster walls, ceilings, and ornamentation in the Merchant’s House were created in the 19th century. On display, original 1832 plaster fragments and molds and plaster casts created by sculptor and ornamental plasterer David Flaharty, who used the same methods as the early 19th century artisans during a house-wide restoration in the 1970s. Included with General Admission.

Through Monday, May 20
Exhibition: The Changing Silhouette of Fashion: The Decade of the 1890s
Day Dress, MHM 2002.0830

The Tredwell Costume Collection comprises more than 400 articles of clothing. The core of the collection consists of 39 dresses documented to have been owned by the women of the family. The Changing Silhouette of Fashion is a changing exhibition featuring Tredwell dresses from each decade of the 19th and early 20th centuries. These dresses show the changing silhouette of fashion over 100 years, and tell us about the women who wore them and the society in which they lived.

Next in the series is a two-piece cotton day dress from the early 1890s. The dress has leg-of-mutton sleeves, which was one of the defining characteristics of ladies fashion during this decade. It also features an even-length hem with no train, making it a more practical option for outdoor activities, such as walking, visiting friends, or shopping. Included with general admission.

Sunday, April 14, 12:30 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets. Upcoming walking tours: April 28; May 12, 26; June 9, 23; July 14, 28.

Friday, April 19, 6:30 p.m.  
“April is the Cruellest Month” Candlelight Ghost Tour
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: May 17, June 21, July 19.

Tuesday, April 23. Reception, 6 p.m. – drinks available for purchase. Presentation, 6:30 p.m.
Illustrated Talk –
Stoops to Conquer: The Evolution of the New York Townhouse
New York City in the popular imagination may be defined by the skyscraper, but in reality, our city’s landscape is dominated by a grid plan that minced most blocks into a staggering number of narrow lots. These produced entire neighborhoods of narrow residential buildings, making the townhouse the true vernacular architecture of the city.

As we prepare for GVSHP’s Annual Benefit House Tour in May, join architect
Richard Sammons as he traces the origins and evolution of the ever-present townhouse in New York City. Townhouses give so many historic neighborhoods their charm, but what are the weaknesses of the form? And how can modern architects and city-dwellers improve upon this classic architectural style to bring the economical, adaptable, and sustainable townhouse into the 21st century?

Richard Sammons is a principal at Fairfax & Sammons Architects, whose offices are in New York and Palm Beach. Richard is an award-winning designer, having designed and rehabilitated dozens of townhouses in his career.

NOTE LOCATION: Salmagundi Club, Lower Gallery, 47 Fifth Avenue
FREE. This event is not fully accessible. Click here for reservations.

Presented in partnership with the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation

Wednesday, April 24, 6:30 p.m.
Illustrated Talk –
The NEW New York: 19th Century Immigration – Kleindeutschland: Little Germany in New York City

This talk will explore a detailed history of the development of the German American community in New York City and the East Village/Lower East Side, within the larger context of 19th-century immigration as a whole. Various aspects of society and day-to-day life in the German community in New York will be discussed, providing insight into specific characteristics of this particular immigrant experience in the city, some physical remnants of which still remain more than a century later.

Richard Haberstroh is a native New Yorker, whose six German ancestors arrived in New York between 1835 and 1852 and resided in Kleindeutschland. He lectures and publishes broadly on various topics including the story of German immigration and settlement in New York City. He is also the author of the book, The German Churches of Metropolitan New York: a Research Guide.

NOTE LOCATION: Third Street Music School, 235 East 11th Street
FREE. Click here for reservations. This event is fully accessible.

Presented in partnership with the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.

Sunday, April 28, 12:30 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets. Upcoming walking tours: May 12, 26; June 9, 23; July 14, 28.

DAILY GUIDED TOURS of the HOUSE

A Self-Guided Tour booklet is available for those who wish to tour the house on their own.
2 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. Thursday (open until 8 p.m., January – September)
2 p.m. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday
Closed Tuesday & Wednesday
Groups by appointment
Explore Manhattan’s “best-preserved” (The New York Times) 19th-century home and learn about the domestic life of a prosperous merchant family and their four Irish servants from 1835 to 1865, as New York City transformed from seaport to thriving metropolis. You’ll visit four floors of this Federal and Greek Revival style row house virtually complete with the family’s original furnishings and decorative arts.
The tour concludes in the 4th-floor Servants’ Quarters, “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in Manhattan,” according to Time Out New York. You are invited to come climb the narrow staircase and see where the wealthy Tredwell family’s staff of four domestic servants lived and did some of their work.
Included with regular admission. (Admission is always FREE for Members)
Reservations not required for groups of fewer than 10 people.
If your group has more than 10 people, please contact us about scheduling a Group Program.