Calendar of Events

MUSEUM HOURS
Thursday, 12 to 8 p.m.
Friday – Monday, 12 to 5 p.m.
(Closed Tuesday, Wednesday, and major holidays.)

GUIDED HOUSE TOURS
Thursday, 2 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.
Friday – Monday, 2 p.m.
Note: A Self-Guided Tour Booklet is available for those who wish to tour the house at their own pace.

CANDLELIGHT GHOST TOURS
Third Friday of the month, November, January – July

WALKING TOURS OF 19TH CENTURY NOHO
Second Sunday of the month, March – November

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS  Click here

JANUARY EVENTS

Thursday, January 18, through Monday, April 30
Exhibition: The Tredwell Book Collection and the Changing 19th Century Culture of Books
Over the course of the their almost 100-year residency on East 4th Street, the Tredwells collected 314 books. These volumes, many inscribed, provide a glimpse into the family’s interests, tastes, and intellectual pursuits over the century. It is not surprising that the most common subject/genre of literature is education, including foreign languages, since books in the 19th century were meant to be studied. Religion, biography, poetry, and fiction followed.

Most of the Tredwell books were published in New York City during the early to mid-19th century, a period known as the “emerging mass culture of print.” The availability of booksellers close to the Tredwells’ home and the close proximity of the three largest libraries in New York City all place the family in the center of a rapidly changing 19th century book culture. Based on the amount and the variety of books they owned, and their condition, which shows good use, the Tredwells were active participants.
Free with General Admission

Friday, January 19, 6:30 p.m. 
Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50-60 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: Friday, February 16, March 16, April 20, May 18, June 15, July 20.

Monday, January 22, 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Illustrated lecture: The 19th Century City and the Book Market
Architectural historian Francis Morrone has for the last several years been studying the history of New York as a center of American book culture – publishing, printing, bookselling, libraries, and book reviewing. Morrone will discuss the Village’s and the Union Square area’s 19th-century history as a center of the book trade — of publishers, bookstores, and printers.

Mr. Morrone’s lecture will highlight  the museum’s exhibition (above) “The Tredwell Book Collection and the Changing 19th Century Culture of Books.” The Tredwell books provide a glimpse into the family’s interests, tastes, and intellectual pursuits, and were published almost exclusively in New York City during the early to mid-19th century, a period known as the “emerging mass culture of print.”

Admission is free. Reservations are required; click here to reserve.
NOTE LOCATION: Jefferson Market Library, 425 Sixth  Avenue (at 10th Street)
Co-sponsored by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation and the Merchant’s House Museum.

Wednesday, January 24, 6:30 p.m.
Illustrated Lecture: Lafayette Place/Lafayette Street: A Topographical History
by Francis Morrone

When and how did fashionable and tranquil Lafayette Place — 100-feet wide, 3-blocks long, with no cross streets — come into being in the 19th century? By what stages did it evolve? How and when did Lafayette Place become Lafayette Street, and how did the new, much longer, street develop? This lecture will cover, among other things, the conditions that both brought the Merchant’s House into being — and its preservation and survival defied. Not least, this will be a lecture on New York maps and their use in research.

A collaboration with the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art.
$30 General Public, $20 MHM & ICAA Members. Seating is limited. Doors open at 6:15 p.m.
Click here to purchase tickets.

Francis Morrone is a renowned architectural historian and writer. The author of eleven books, including, most recently, “Guide to New York City Urban Landscapes” (W.W. Norton, 2013). Morrone has also written highly-regarded architectural guidebooks to Philadelphia, and Brooklyn. His writings have appeared in many publications, including the Wall Street Journal, the New Criterion, City Journal, Humanities and the New York Sun, where he was an art and architecture critic. He teaches architectural and urban history at New York University, and is the recipient of the university’s Excellence in Teaching Award. Travel + Leisure magazine named him as one of the 13 best tour guides in the world. Other awards include the Arthur Ross Award of the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art.

FEBRUARY EVENTS

Friday, February 9, 6:30 p.m.
Mind Reading and Mysticism at the Merchant’s House with Mentalist Kent Axell
In the mid 19th century, New Yorkers, like the Tredwells, hosted neighbors and friends in their home to showcase the latest in mysticism and psychic entertainments. Spiritualism, which had become a phenomenon in 1848 thanks to the now-infamous Fox sisters, peaked in popularity in the years immediately after the Civil War. It is certainly no wonder: the loss of life was massive, spurring believers and skeptics alike to turn to Spiritualism — the belief that the living can talk to the dead — as one last chance for contact with a loved one, lost too soon.

In addition to providing comfort to the bereaved, Spiritualism grew as a popular form of parlor entertainment. We invite you to join renowned mentalist Kent Axell in the family’s Greek Revival double parlor as he takes us back in time 150 years to experience mind reading, magic, and mystery. Whether he answers your sealed questions, reads your mind — or controls it — you’re guaranteed to feel the haunting touch of one of history’s most obscure, and awe-inspiring, art forms.
Capacity is very limited.
$40, $50 VIP Seats (first two rows)
$30 MHM Members. Click here to purchase tickets.

Wednesday, February 14, 7 p.m. (Pre-concert Reception 6 p.m.)
Love in the Parlors — A Valentine in Concert
The Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society presents lush, romantic vocal music of the world’s greatest 19th-century composers performed in the Museum’s elegant Greek Revival double parlor. Singers Anthony Bellov, Amy Gluck, Jane Elizabeth Rady, and Dayle Vander Sande perform rarely heard gems by Schubert, Brahms, Duparc, Dvorak, Amy Beach, Johann Strauss II, and others.
75 minutes. Very limited capacity.
$50, VIP $60 (first two rows), $30 MHM Members.  Click here to purchase tickets.

Pre-concert Reception, 6 p.m.
Join us for light hors d’oeuvres and a glass of bubbly in our cozy, candlelit 1850s kitchen before the concert.
$25,  $15 MHM Members. Click here to purchase tickets.

Friday, February 16, 6:30 p.m. 
Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50-60 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: Friday, March 16, April 20, May 18, June 15, July 20.

Saturday, February 24, March 24, and April 28 – 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Behind-the-Ropes: Insider’s Tours of the Merchant’s House
Join us for a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen for coffee and a focused overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and its intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic and open locked doors … and more. From late Federal to Greek Revival; Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene, you’ll gain new insight and perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

Saturday, February 24The Architecture of an 1832 Landmark
We’ll explore in detail the architecture of Antebellum New York, how to differentiate between styles, and tips on the fine points of what to look for on your own explorations. Then we’ll examine the 1832 Merchant’s House in depth, one of only 117 buildings designated both an interior and exterior landmark in New York, including details of the ornamental plaster, considered the finest surviving from the period and several spaces not normally seen by the regular Museum visitor.

Saturday, March 24100 Years of Domestic Lighting
In March, we’ll examine the evolution of 19th century domestic lighting and the story of technological advances and changing lifestyles it tells using examples throughout the Museum, including many not normally on exhibition.

Saturday, April 28Changing Tastes in 19th Century Furniture
In the final tour of this series , we’ll discuss the finer points of the original Tredwell family collection of furniture and what it tells us about both the tastes and values of Antebellum New Yorkers and how growing international connections made lasting impact on design, trade, and international relations.

About presenter Anthony Bellov: Bachelor of Architecture, Pratt Institute; graduate, Museum Leadership program, Bank Street College; certified New York State real estate instructor/lecturer; long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum, and an aficionado in 19th century American decorative arts and architecture.

Limited to 20 participants.
$30, $25 Members. Series of three programs, $75, $60 MHM Members
Click here to purchase tickets.

Tuesday, February 27, 6:30 p.m.
Members-Only Collection Close-Up
Come for a tour and a behind-the-scenes look at the Tredwell Books Collection.
FREE for Members. Reservations required.
Members, please email nyc1832@merchantshouse.org. To become a member, click here.

MARCH EVENTS

Sunday, March 11, 12:30 p.m.
Second Sunday Walking Tours resume!

A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Next walking tours: April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8.

Tuesday, March 13, 6:30 p.m.
Illustrated lecture: Journey of Hope: The Irish in New York
With Tara Ryder, Ph.D
To escape religious persecution and decades of poverty and famine, waves of Irish immigrants arrived in New York from the 18th century on. By the mid-19th century, one quarter of the City’s population was Irish. Many Irish women and girls found jobs as live-in servants for New York’s wealthy citizens, the Tredwells among them. It is a compelling story: they typically emigrated from Ireland at a young age, were willing to do the work others shunned, and often endured cruel prejudice. Yet, despite it all, these women managed to persevere, and collectively sent millions of dollars home so that their relatives could escape the troubles at home for a better life.

The Museum’s servants quarters are “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in Manhattan” (TimeOut New York). Unfortunately, little is known about the Tredwells’ four servants besides their names, ages, and place of birth (Ireland), taken from census reports; they themselves left no written record. One thing is certain though: the family’s lifestyle of on East 4th Street would have been utterly impossible without them.

This talk will take a fascinating multimedia look at the history and culture of the Irish of New York from their immigrant beginnings to the present day. Their journey of hope is reflected in the shared experiences of immigrants from around the world coming to America.

Tara Rider is the director of Stony Brook University’s international academic programs to both Ireland and England, where she seeks to introduce students to new cultures, ideas, and histories. She earned her Ph.D. in history from SUNY Stony Brook.

Free. Reservations are required. TBA.
NOTE LOCATION: Church of St. Brigid, which was built in 1848 by Irish immigrants for those fleeing the Great Famine, 119 Avenue B (SE corner of 8th Street)

Co-sponsored by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.
This Public Scholars event, which is free and open to the public, is made possible through the support of the New York Council for the Humanities, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Thursday, March 15, 5 to 8 p.m. (Guided tour at 6:30 p.m.)
A Toast to Bridget Murphy!
Join us for light refreshments (yes, green beer!) and a pre-St. Patrick’s Day back-stairs tour. You’ll climb the narrow staircase to the fourth-floor servants’ quarters and see where the Tredwells’ four Irish servants lived and did some of their work, “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in New York City” (Time Out New York).
Free with general Admission. Reservations are not required.

Friday, March 16, 6:30 & 7 p.m.
“Spirit of the Irish” Candlelight Ghost Tour
Includes the 4th Floor Servants’ Quarters!
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them. Many of the most peculiar occurrences have been related to the Tredwells’ Irish servants, and so this special tour will include the 4th floor Servants’ Quarters.
50 minutes. $40, $25 Members.
Click here to purchase tickets.

Saturday, March 17, Guided Tours at 12:30 p.m., 2 p.m., 3:30 p.m.
St. Patrick’s Day: A Tribute to the Tredwells’ Irish Servants with Bridget Murphy
Join us for a back-stairs tour and experience the Merchant’s House through the eyes of the Irish immigrants who worked as domestic servants for the Tredwell family. You’ll climb the narrow staircase to the fourth-floor servants’ quarters and see where the Tredwells’ four Irish servants lived and did some of their work, “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in New York City” (Time Out New York). What did the servants do on their day off? Where did they shop? Go to church? How did they find employment when they first arrived? Learn why it would have been impossible to run a home like the Merchant’s House without them.
Included with General Admission. Reservations not required.

Saturday, March 24, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Behind-the-Ropes: Insider’s Tours of the Merchant’s House
Join us for the second in a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen for coffee and a focused overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and its intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic and open locked doors … and more. From late Federal to Greek Revival; Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene, you’ll gain new insight and perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

100 Years of Domestic Lighting
We’ll examine the evolution of 19th century domestic lighting and the story of technological advances and changing lifestyles it tells using examples throughout the Museum, including many not normally on exhibition.

About presenter Anthony Bellov: Bachelor of Architecture, Pratt Institute; graduate, Museum Leadership program, Bank Street College; certified New York State real estate instructor/lecturer; long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum, and an aficionado in 19th century American decorative arts and architecture.

Limited to 20 participants.
$30, $25 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.

APRIL EVENTS

Sunday, April 8, 12:30 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho (Second Sunday of Every Month)
Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House.  You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.

And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!

Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the
 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.
$15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming walking tours: May 13, June 10, July 8.

Wednesday, April 11, 6:30 p.m.
Illustrated Lecture – The History of the Bowery: 400 Years of the City’s Oldest Street
With David Mulkins
FREE. Reservations are required. TBA.
Co-sponsored by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation.

Friday, April 20, 6:30 p.m. 
“April is the Cruellest Month” Candlelight Ghost Tour
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where eight family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: May 18, June 15, July 20.

Saturday, April 28, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Behind-the-Ropes: Insiders’ Tours of the Merchant’s House
Join us for the last in a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen for coffee and a focused overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and its intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic and open locked doors … and more. From late Federal to Greek Revival; Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene, you’ll gain new insight and perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

Changing Tastes in 19th Century Furniture
In the final tour of this series, we’ll discuss the finer points of the original Tredwell family collection of furniture and what it tells us about both the tastes and values of Antebellum New Yorkers and how growing international connections made lasting impact on design, trade, and international relations.

About presenter Anthony Bellov: Bachelor of Architecture, Pratt Institute; graduate, Museum Leadership program, Bank Street College; certified New York State real estate instructor/lecturer; long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum, and an aficionado in 19th century American decorative arts and architecture.

Limited to 20 participants.
$30, $25 Members.
Click here to purchase tickets.

DAILY GUIDED TOURS of the HOUSE

A Self-Guided Tour booklet is available for those who wish to tour the house on their own.

2 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. Thursday (open until 8 p.m.)
2 p.m. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday
Closed Tuesday & Wednesday
Groups by appointment

Explore Manhattan’s “best-preserved” (The New York Times) 19th-century home and learn about the domestic life of a prosperous merchant family and their four Irish servants from 1835 to 1865, as New York City transformed from seaport to thriving metropolis. You’ll visit four floors of this Federal and Greek Revival style row house virtually complete with the family’s original furnishings and decorative arts.

The tour concludes in the 4th-floor Servants’ Quarters, “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in Manhattan,” according to Time Out New York. You are invited to come climb the narrow staircase and see where the wealthy Tredwell family’s staff of four domestic servants lived and did some of their work.

Included with regular admission. (Admission is always FREE for Members)
Reservations not required for groups of fewer than 10 people.
If your group has more than 10 people, please contact us about scheduling a Group Program.