Calendar of Events

MUSEUM HOURS
Thursday, 12 to 8 p.m. (January – September), 12 to 5 p.m. (October – December)
Friday – Monday, 12 to 5 p.m.
(Closed Tuesday, Wednesday, and major holidays.)

GUIDED HOUSE TOURS
Thursday, 2 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. (January – September)
Friday – Monday, 2 p.m.
A Self-Guided Tour Booklet is available for those who wish to tour the house at their own pace.

CANDLELIGHT GHOST TOURS
Third Friday of the month, January – July, and November

WALKING TOURS OF 19TH CENTURY NOHO
Second and Fourth Sunday of the month, March – November

EVENTS & EXHIBITIONS

JANUARY

Opens Thursday, January 17, through Monday, April 15
Exhibition: “Finest Surviving:” Ornamental Plasterwork at the Merchant’s House Museum
The 1832 Merchant’s House is one of only 120 buildings in New York City distinguished as an exterior – and interior – landmark. Its intact original ornamental plaster work is considered the “finest surviving” from the period. Learn how the plaster walls, ceilings, and ornamentation in the Merchant’s House were created in the 19th century. On display, original 1832 plaster fragments and molds and plaster casts created by sculptor and ornamental plasterer David Flaharty, who used the same methods as the early 19th century artisans during a house-wide restoration in the 1970s. Included with General Admission.

Friday, January 25, 6:30 p.m. & 7 p.m.
Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50-60 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: Friday, February 15, March 15, April 19, May 17, June 21, July 19.

Saturday, January 26, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Behind-the-Ropes: Insider’s Tours of the Merchant’s House
First in a Series – The Architecture of an 1832 Landmark (Manhattan’s First)
Next up:
Saturday, February 23:
Changing Tastes in 19th Century Furniture
Saturday, March 30: 100 Years of Domestic Lighting
Join us for a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll explore in detail the architecture of the 1832 Merchant’s House, one of only 120 buildings designated an interior and exterior landmark in New York, and examine the finer points of the original Tredwell family collection of furniture and domestic lighting.

We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen (bring your own coffee) for an overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic. We’ll pull out drawers to show furniture construction details, remove shades of lamps to see the workings, open locked doors … and more. From late Federal to Greek Revival, Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene, you’ll gain new perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

Anthony Bellov: Bachelor’s in Architecture from Pratt Institute, Graduate in Museum Leadership from Bank Street College of Education, long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum and an aficionado in 19th Century American Decorative Arts and Architecture.

$30, $25 Members. Limited to 20 participants. Click here to purchase tickets.

Wednesday, January 30, 6:30 p.m. 
Illustrated Lecture: Just Another Brick in the Wall: The Mating of Brick and Terracotta in Six Great New York Buildings 
Brick and terracotta are the chocolate and peanut butter of architecture. Fine each on its own, together they create something uniquely delicious. In some cases, the combination was a means of achieving sumptuous effects without the use of expensive stone. Stanford White was the master of this approach. In other cases, the materials were used for their own beauty. Little sets the architecture buff’s juices flowing as does elegant brickwork, and New York architects’ wildly varied uses of terracotta have given this city some of its most exquisite and exuberant decoration.

This illustrated lecture will explore the properties of these materials, and architects’ uses of them in combination, through a look at six buildings: Babb, Cook & Willard’s DeVinne Press Building (right at the Merchant House’s corner), Bruce Price’s St. James Building, William B. Tuthill’s Carnegie Hall (one of the most underrated buildings in New York), Ralph Walker’s 60 Hudson Street, McKim, Mead & White’s Judson Memorial Church, and Henry J. Hardenbergh’s Schermerhorn Building (just down the street from the Merchant’s House).

A collaboration with the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art.
$30 General Public, $20 MHM & ICAA Members.
SOLD OUT. Email nyc1832@merchantshouse.org to join the wait list.
Seating is limited. Doors open at 6:15 p.m.

Francis Morrone is a renowned architectural historian and writer. The author of eleven books, including, most recently, “Guide to New York City Urban Landscapes” (W.W. Norton, 2013). Morrone has also written highly regarded architectural guidebooks to Philadelphia, and Brooklyn. His writings have appeared in many publications, including the Wall Street Journal, the New Criterion, City Journal, Humanities and the New York Sun, where he was an art and architecture critic. He teaches architectural and urban history at New York University, and is the recipient of the university’s Excellence in Teaching Award. Travel + Leisure magazine named him as one of the 13 best tour guides in the world. Other awards include the Arthur Ross Award of the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art.

FEBRUARY

Thursday, January 17, through Monday, April 15
Exhibition: “Finest Surviving:” Ornamental Plaster Work at the Merchant’s House Museum
The 1832 Merchant’s House is distinguished as one of only 120 interior landmarks in New York City. Its intact original ornamental plaster work is considered the “finest surviving” from the period. Learn how the plaster walls, ceilings, and ornamentation in the Merchant’s House were created in the 19th century. On display, original 1832 plaster fragments and molds and plaster casts created by sculptor and ornamental plasterer David Flaharty, who used the same methods as the early 19th century artisans during a house-wide restoration in the 1970s. Included with General Admission.

Thursday, February 14, 7 p.m.
Love in the Parlors — A Valentine in Concert
The Bond Street Euterpean Singing Society presents a gala concert of lush, romantic vocal music  performed in the Museum’s elegant Greek Revival double parlor. Singers Anthony Bellov, Amy Gluck, Jane Elizabeth Rady, and Dayle Vander Sande perform rarely heard gems by the world’s greatest 19th-century composers: Schumann, Rossini, Tchaikovsky, Amy Beach, Johann Strauss II, and others. Chosen by NBC Online and TimeOut NY as a top pick for Valentine’s Day.
90minutes. Very limited capacity.
General admission $50, VIP (first 2 rows) $65
MHM Members $30, VIP $45. Click here to purchase tickets.

Friday, February 15, 6:30 p.m. 
Dark Days of Winter Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House” (The New York Times)
Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)
50-60 minutes. $30, $20 Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming Ghost Tours: Friday, March 15, April 19, May 17, June 21, July 19.

Saturday, February 23, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Behind-the-Ropes: Insider’s Tours of the Merchant’s House
Second in a Series – Changing Tastes in 19th Century Furniture

Next up: Saturday, March 30: 100 Years of Domestic Lighting
Join us for a series of rare off-hours tours of the Merchant’s House. We’ll explore in detail the architecture of the 1832 Merchant’s House, one of only 120 buildings designated an interior and exterior landmark in New York, and examine the finer points of the original Tredwell family collection of furniture and domestic lighting.

We’ll gather in the 1850s kitchen (bring your own coffee) for an overview of the landmark Merchant’s House and intact collection of more than 3,000 objects owned by the Tredwell family. We’ll then tour the house, including the rarely seen bedrooms on the 3rd floor (now staff offices), even peek up into the attic. We’ll pull out drawers to show furniture construction details, remove shades of lamps to see the workings, open locked doors … and more. From late Federal to Greek Revival, Duncan Phyfe to Rococo Revival; whale oil to gas to kerosene, you’ll gain new perspectives on these unique insider’s tours, learning about changing period styles and technologies and how they reflect the attitudes and values of the merchant class in mid-19th century New York City.

Anthony Bellov: Bachelor’s in Architecture from Pratt Institute, Graduate in Museum Leadership from Bank Street College of Education, long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum and an aficionado in 19th Century American Decorative Arts and Architecture.

$30, $25 Members. Limited to 20 participants. Click here to purchase tickets.

DAILY GUIDED TOURS of the HOUSE

A Self-Guided Tour booklet is available for those who wish to tour the house on their own.
2 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. Thursday (open until 8 p.m., January – September)
2 p.m. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday
Closed Tuesday & Wednesday
Groups by appointment
Explore Manhattan’s “best-preserved” (The New York Times) 19th-century home and learn about the domestic life of a prosperous merchant family and their four Irish servants from 1835 to 1865, as New York City transformed from seaport to thriving metropolis. You’ll visit four floors of this Federal and Greek Revival style row house virtually complete with the family’s original furnishings and decorative arts.
The tour concludes in the 4th-floor Servants’ Quarters, “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in Manhattan,” according to Time Out New York. You are invited to come climb the narrow staircase and see where the wealthy Tredwell family’s staff of four domestic servants lived and did some of their work.
Included with regular admission. (Admission is always FREE for Members)
Reservations not required for groups of fewer than 10 people.
If your group has more than 10 people, please contact us about scheduling a Group Program.