Calendar of Events

MUSEUM HOURS
Thursday, 12 to 8 p.m. (January – September), 12 to 5 p.m. (October – December)
Friday – Monday, 12 to 5 p.m.
(Closed Tuesday, Wednesday, and major holidays.)

GUIDED HOUSE TOURS
Thursday, 2 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. (January – September)
Friday – Monday, 2 p.m.
A Self-Guided Tour Booklet is available for those who wish to tour the house at their own pace.

CANDLELIGHT GHOST TOURS
Third Friday of the month, January – July, and November
October 19, 20, 24-30.

WALKING TOURS OF 19TH CENTURY NOHO
Second and Fourth Sunday of the month, March – November.

 

OCTOBER EVENTS

The Merchant’s House Museum will close at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in October, November, and December. Thursday evening hours resume in January 2019.

A PHANTOM FETE: ATTEND IN SPIRIT
Don’t Save the Date, Save the Merchant’s House!
All donations (fully tax-deductible) will go directly towards real-world legal and engineering expenses to defeat the proposed 8-story hotel next door.
Click here to DONATE. Any amount will help!
The developers won’t have a ghost of a chance!

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CLICK HERE for the FULL CALENDAR of  OCTOBER EVENTS TO DIE FOR, including Candlelight Ghost Tours, 1865 Funeral Reenactment, and more.
These events SELL OUT quickly, please book in advance.


Thursday, October 4 – Monday, November 5
Exhibition – A Good Death: 19th Century Lessons in Dying Well
Including rarely exhibited items of Tredwell family mourning dress and accessories from the collection.

Poignant recreated scenes of death and grief during the 19th century explore a time when families gathered by the bedside of the dying and funerals were held at home. Pay your last respects at family patriarch Seabury Tredwell’s deathbed upstairs, then join in the mourning in the double parlor, hung with black crepe and set with a coffin for his funeral. In the 20th century, with advances in medicine, hospitals became the place of death and many customs of dying, bereavement, and remembrance disappeared. Today, many of these customs are making a resurgence as a Good Death takes on new meaning.

NEW this year! 19th century postmortem portraiture from The Burns Archive and 21st century neo-conceptual artist Heide Hatry‘s posthumous portraits created out of human ash.

We invite you to stage your own pre-postmortem photograph in our 19th century coffin. Then share with your friends on Instagram and Twitter #mhmcoffin2018.

Included with regular admission; reservations not required.

NEW this year! Wednesday, October 10, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Walking Tour: Edgar Allan Poe in Greenwich Village with Boroughs of the Dead
Click here to purchase tickets.

NEW this year!
October 12 – October 31
Killing an Evening with Edgar Allan Poe: Murder at the Merchant’s House
Starring John Kevin Jones (A Christmas Carol at the Merchant’s House) as Edgar Allan Poe

Click here to purchase tickets and for more information.

Saturday, October 13, 2 to 5 p.m.
Sidewalk Sale to Save the Merchant’s House!
Decorative items, china, glass, collectibles, costume jewelry, antiques (non-Merchant’s House!), all at bargain prices to benefit our Legal Fund to Defeat the Developers. Or pay double as a donation! merchantshouse.org/calltoarms #savethemerchantshouse #dontmesswithgertrude

Sunday, October 14, 12:30 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho
(Second Sunday of Every Month)

Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House. You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.
And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!
Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m. $15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming Tours: October 28, November 11, November 25.

On Sunday, October 14, the Merchant’s House Museum will close at 3 p.m. for that afternoon’s 1865 Funeral Reenactment.

Sunday, October 14, 3:30 to 5 p.m.
“Sacred to the Memory:” 1865 Funeral Reenactment
Click here to purchase tickets.

Thursday, October 18, 7 p.m.
Chant Macabre: Songs from the Crypt
Click here to purchase tickets.

Friday, October 19 & Saturday, October 20 
Wednesday, October 24 – Tuesday, October 30 
Candlelight Ghost Tours of ‘Manhattan’s Most Haunted House’ (The New York Times)
Updated with the latest eerie happenings!

Click here to purchase tickets.

NEW this year!
MIDNIGHT, Friday, October 19 & 26; Saturday, October 20 & 27

Dead-of-Night Candlelight Ghost Tour & Investigation
With Paranormal Investigator Dan Sturges

Click here to purchase tickets.

Sunday, October 28, 12:30 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)

Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House. You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.
And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!
Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.

$15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming walking tours: November 11, November 25.

NOVEMBER EVENTS

The Merchant’s House Museum will CLOSE at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in November and December. Thursday evening hours resume in January 2019.

Thursday, November 1, 6:30 p.m.
The Art of Mourning: 19th Century Postmortem and Memorial Photography
Illustrated Talk by Elizabeth A. Burns

At the time of the birth of photography in 1839, death was a natural and pervasive part of everyday life and mostly took place at home. People used photography to memorialize their loved ones with a reverence little understood today; often these photographs were the only images the bereaved had of the deceased. They are testament to an era when the magic of photography offered the hope of extending relationships. At the moment people were most vulnerable, photography offered a memento that seemed real — a tangible visual object that allowed continued closeness to the deceased. We can feel the power of these photographs generations after the images were made. We relate to these pictures of strangers because they speak a universal language of emotions — tenderness, affection, need, hope, loss and despair — uniting the human family in common experience.
$20, MHM Members $10. Click here to purchase tickets.

Elizabeth A. Burns is the Creative and Operations Director of The Burns Archive, which houses over one million historic photographs from the birth of photography through the atomic age. She co-authored Sleeping Beauty II: Grief, Bereavement & The Family in Memorial Photography, American and European Traditions produced in conjunction with the Musée d’Orsay exhibition, Le Dernier Portrait. She has curated and worked on hundreds of exhibits, publications and films on memorial photography. Liz lives in New York City and actively promotes history and photography through publications, exhibitions and events. www.burnsarchive.com


Friday, November 2, 6:30 p.m.
Icons in Ash: Contemporary and Historic Mourning Practices
Presentation by Heide Hatry and Zoë Crossland

In the 19th century, mourning practices and remembrances, such as postmortem photography and hair jewelry, were closely linked to the physical remains of the dead. By the 20th century, as death became more medicalized and no longer took place in the home, mourning became less focused on physical connections with the dead body and more on memories. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in the material traces of the dead, particularly in relation to cremated remains.

In this presentation, artist Heide Hatry and Professor Zoë Crossland reflect on contemporary mourning practices, what they share with older and abandoned traditions, and where they differ. What might this tell us about changing attitudes to death and mourning in the modern world? Free. Reservations required; click here to reserve.

Heide Hatry is a New York based German artist best known for her performance work, her conceptual work using unconventional materials, and her collaborative conceptual artist’s books. Her most recent body of work, Icons in Ash (2017), consists of portraits made from the cremated remains of their subjects, a social art project that has made a contribution to a re-imagining of our relationship to the dead.

Zoë Crossland is Director of the Center for Archaeology and Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, Columbia University. Her research and published work explore the problems of archaeological and forensic evidence and archaeology’s relationship to the dead body. Her current project, The Speaking Corpse, explores the evidence of the forensic corpse, the ways in which it is explained for popular consumption, and the history that lies behind the treatment of the dead as evidence.

Through Saturday, November 3
Reimagine End of Life New York
A week exploring big questions about life and death. Join us for a community-wide exploration of death and celebration of life through creativity and conversation. Drawing on the arts, spirituality, healthcare, and design, Reimagine End of Life is a week long series of events that break down taboos and bring diverse communities together in wonder, preparation, and remembrance. Reimagine End of Life envisions a world in which we are all able to reflect on why we’re here, prepare for a time when we won’t be, and live fully right up until the end. Click here for events and more information.

Through Monday, November 5
Exhibition – A Good Death: 19th Century Lessons in Dying Well
Including rarely exhibited items of Tredwell family mourning dress and accessories from the collection.

Poignant recreated scenes of death and grief during the 19th century explore a time when families gathered by the bedside of the dying and funerals were held at home. Pay your last respects at family patriarch Seabury Tredwell’s deathbed upstairs, then join in the mourning in the double parlor, hung with black crepe and set with a coffin for his funeral. In the 20th century, with advances in medicine, hospitals became the place of death and many customs of dying, bereavement, and remembrance disappeared. Today, many of these customs are making a resurgence as a Good Death takes on new meaning.

NEW this year! 19th century postmortem portraiture from The Burns Archive and 21st century neo-conceptual artist Heide Hatry‘s posthumous portraits created out of human ash.

We invite you to stage your own pre-postmortem photograph in our 19th century coffin. Then share with your friends on Instagram and Twitter #mhmcoffin2018.

Included with regular admission; reservations not required.

Sunday, November 11, 12:30 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)

Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House. You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.
And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!
Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.

$15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming walking tours: November 25.

Friday, November 16, 6:30 p.m.
Pre-Thanksgiving Candlelight Ghost Tour of “Manhattan’s Most Haunted House”
Haunted by the prospect of your relatives at Thanksgiving? Join us on a Candlelight Ghost Tour to get in the mood. Doors slam, floorboards creak, voices call into the dead of night. Venture into the shadows of history to see the house where seven family members died (and The New York Times called “Manhattan’s Most Haunted”) by flickering candlelight and hear true tales of inexplicable occurrences from the people who actually experienced them.
50 minutes. $30, $25 Members. Tickets on sale mid-October.

“#1 Most Haunted Place in NYC” (TimeOut New York)

Friday, November 23, through Monday, January 7
Exhibition –
Christmas Comes to Old New York: Holiday Traditions of the Tredwell Family

Scenes of holiday preparation recreated in the period rooms throughout the house show how many of our modern holiday traditions originated in mid-19th century New York. From table-top Christmas trees decorated with candles and handmade ornaments, to poinsettias and evergreens decking the halls, Christmas songs and carols, presents and stockings. And, of course, Santa Claus. On display, rarely exhibited Christmas presents from the Tredwell collection.
Free with museum admission.

Friday, November 23, through Monday, January  7
Exhibition –
Charles Dickens Performs ‘A Christmas Carol’ in New York, December 1867
In December 1867, Charles Dickens arrived in New York City for a month of sold-out performances of his beloved 1843 holiday classic, A Christmas Carol. Dickens performed at the 2,500 seat Steinway Hall on 14th Street, the center of cultural life in the city, and just a few blocks from the Tredwell home. And the critics raved: “The Christmas Carol becomes doubly enchanting when one hears it performed by Dickens.” (New York Herald, 1867)

Exhibition in conjunction with A CHRISTMAS CAROL at the MERCHANT’S HOUSE, Charles Dickens in New York, 1867
Starring John Kevin Jones as Mr. Dickens. 

Limited run, November 30 – December 31.

Sunday, November 25, 12:30 p.m. (Last of the year! Walking Tours resume in March.)
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho
(Second & Fourth Sunday of Every Month)

Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos – and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House. You’ll see how the neighborhood surrounding the Tredwells’ home evolved from a refined and tranquil residential enclave into a busy commercial center. Visit important 19th century landmark buildings on this tour through 21st century NoHo.
And what’s a plunge into the past without a little scandal? On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the notorious 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes!
Tour is one hour and begins promptly at 12:30 p.m.
Promenaders will return to the Museum in time to take the 2 p.m. Guided Tour if they wish.

$15; FREE for Members. Click here to purchase tickets.
Upcoming walking tours: March 2019!

DECEMBER EVENTS

The Merchant’s House Museum will close at 5 p.m. on Thursdays in December.
Thursday evening hours resume in January 2019.

6th SMASH Year!
Limited engagement November 27 through December 29.
A CHRISTMAS CAROL at the MERCHANT’S  HOUSE,
Charles Dickens in New York, 1867
Starring John Kevin Jones as Mr. Dickens
Come celebrate the season with this unique retelling of a holiday classic, set in the Museum’s Greek Revival double parlor decorated in 19th century holiday style. Perfect for families. Meet Mr. Dickens and toast the holidays before the performance. Mulled wine, cider, and light fare.
Click here for tickets, performance schedule, and more information.

“The Christmas Carol becomes doubly enchanting when one hears it performed by Dickens.” New York Herald, 1867
TimeOut New York: “One of the 10 Best Plays to see this holiday season”
“Masterful storytelling” and a “tour de force”

Sunday, December 16, 2 to 6 p.m.
Members Only ($500+): Holiday Celebration at the Historic 1853 Salmagundi Club

The Salmagundi Art Club, 47 5th Avenue

The lights are twinkling, there’s music in the air, and we are celebrating this festive season by stepping back in time, through the doors of the elegant façade at 47 Fifth Ave. The Salmagundi Art Club’s landmark double-wide 1853 house is lovingly maintained and full of art, historic details, and ephemera that tell the story of the house and the Club itself, whose strong legacy provides a center for representational art.

Members of the Merchant’s House Museum, the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, and the Salmagundi Art Club are invited to venture up the steps to see the art, enjoy a cocktail in the vintage bar, watch 5th Avenue go by from the elegant period parlor, and explore the building’s library and countless original details. Spend time with friends new and old, learning about the important work our three organizations are doing to preserve our historic buildings, our neighborhood, and the legacies of art, community, architecture, and music.
Co-sponsored by the Salmagundi Art Club, GVSHP, and the Merchant’s House Museum. 
This event is not fully accessible.

Not a member at the $500 level, but want to attend? Click here to join or increase.
Or call 212-777-1089.

JANUARY 2019 EVENTS

NEW YEAR’S DAY, Tuesday, January 1, 2 to 5 p.m.
‘Come Calling’ on New Year’s Day
Paying calls on friends and family on New Year’s Day was one of Old New York’s most cherished customs. Join us for tours of the house, 19th century readings about New Year’s Day celebrations, and punch and confectionery, as we continue the 19th century tradition of renewing, reviving, and reaffirming friendships. Holiday Raffle drawing at 4:30 p.m. “New York seemed to enjoy a general carnival. Broadway, from one end to the other, was alive with private carriages, omnibuses, cabs, and curricles, and lines of pedestrians fringed the carriageways.” From the Diary of Philip Hone, 1844. $20, FREE for members Members.

 

DAILY GUIDED TOURS of the HOUSE

A Self-Guided Tour booklet is available for those who wish to tour the house on their own.
2 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. Thursday (open until 8 p.m., January – September)
2 p.m. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday
Closed Tuesday & Wednesday
Groups by appointment
Explore Manhattan’s “best-preserved” (The New York Times) 19th-century home and learn about the domestic life of a prosperous merchant family and their four Irish servants from 1835 to 1865, as New York City transformed from seaport to thriving metropolis. You’ll visit four floors of this Federal and Greek Revival style row house virtually complete with the family’s original furnishings and decorative arts.
The tour concludes in the 4th-floor Servants’ Quarters, “arguably the oldest intact site of Irish habitation in Manhattan,” according to Time Out New York. You are invited to come climb the narrow staircase and see where the wealthy Tredwell family’s staff of four domestic servants lived and did some of their work.
Included with regular admission. (Admission is always FREE for Members)
Reservations not required for groups of fewer than 10 people.
If your group has more than 10 people, please contact us about scheduling a Group Program.