We’re “at Home” — Virtually

“At Home” Exhibitions, Tours, Talks, Videos, and Programs,
all Online, at a Social Distance

The museum has been closed since March 13 and during this unprecedented period we’ve
been offering an expanding roster of “at home” programs.
Each dollar we receive will help keep us thriving through this crisis and beyond, ensuring that
the museum remains a pillar of education of 19th century New York. 

Please Donate to Our Future!
Click here to make a donation.

 

Exhibitions Online

Click here for all virtual exhibitions.

NEW! The Index of American Design at the National Gallery of Art

Sylvia: A 19th Century Life Unveiled

Icons in Ash

Our Stuff, Ourselves

Behind Closed Doors & Drawers

 

Videos & Lectures to Watch

Blueprint NYC TV Episode on the Merchant’s House, Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment

Explore NY / “Tourist in Your Own Town:” A 1950s Christmas in an 1850s House
The New York Landmark Conservancy

“The NEW New York: Immigration, 1820-1880s,” Illustrated Talk by SJ Costello

“It’s Amazing Out There,” featuring the Merchant’s House, The Weather Channel

“Arts in the City,” TV Episode on the Merchant’s House, CUNY TV

“Standing the Test of Time: The Merchant’s House and a Neighborhood Transformed,” Illustrated Talk by Francis Morrone

“Lafayette Place/ Lafayette Street: A Topographical History,” Illustrated Talk by Francis Morrone

 

Virtual Tours

“Welcome to My Home,” a virtual house tour with Eliza Tredwell (AKA Museum Historian Ann Haddad): on Instagram and Facebook

A Walking Tour of 19th Century NoHo, on HistoryPin.org

Virtual Tour of the Merchant’s House, with Google Expeditions

 

Books and Articles to Read

A Selected Bibliography of NYC History

Merchant’s House Museum Blog, by Museum Historian Ann Haddad

An Old Merchant’s House and Miracle on Fourth Street, by Museum Historian Emeritus Mary Knapp

 

Talks Online via Zoom

Thursday, May 21, 6 p.m.
The Architecture of the Merchant’s House: A Virtual Tour
Co-sponsored by Village Preservation
Whether you’ve been to the Merchant’s House Museum before or not, this precious place will come alive as never before in this virtual tour led by Merchant’s House board member and expert Anthony Bellov. Bellov will delve into little-known or rarely noticed fine points of the architecture of the 1832 brick-and-marble rowhouse, an exterior and interior NYC landmark, shedding light on building techniques and the social expectations of New York before the Civil War.

The Merchant’s House Museum is one of the finest surviving examples of late-Federal and Greek Revival architecture. Built in 1832, the Merchant’s House was  Manhattan’s first designated landmark in New York City in 1965 and today one of only 120 buildings that is both an interior and exterior landmark. It is one of only six residences with interior and exterior landmark designation. The Museum tells the story of the domestic life of a wealthy merchant family – the Tredwells – and their four Irish servants, as well as the history of when the mercantile seaport of New York City emerged as a growing metropolis and the commercial emporium of America. It is also the only historic house museum in the Greenwich Village/Soho/NoHo neighborhoods, and of course, we love it.

Click here to register.

Anthony Bellov holds a Bachelor’s in Architecture from Pratt Institute and a Graduate in Museum Leadership from Bank Street College of Education, and is owner of Anthony Bellov Video Productions, an award-winning boutique video production company based in NYC. He is a long-time volunteer and board member of the Merchant’s House Museum and an aficionado in 19th Century American Decorative Arts and Architecture.

Thursday, June 25, 6 p.m.
Sylvia:  A 19th Century Life Unveiled

In 2002, a small, timeworn leather trunk discarded on a sidewalk in Lower Manhattan was found replete with the cherished keepsakes of a 19th century woman. Thus began visual artist Stacy Renee Morrison’s self-proclaimed love affair with Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, whose early life parallels that of Gertrude Tredwell, who lived at 29 East 4th Street, now the Merchant’s House Museum.

Learn about Ms. Morrison’s almost two decades-long quest to weave together Sylvia’s life in the 19th century through the personal belongings she left behind — and to re-imagine it in today’s world through art and fashion.

Click here to register.

This talk is presented in conjunction with our virtual exhibition of the same name. Click here to view.

Stacy Renee Morrison is a visual artist who often forgets what century it is.  She finds herself haunted by women who lived their lives well before her own and creates visual biographies of their pasts. When Stacy is fully present in the 21st century, she teaches in the BFA Photography and Video Department and MFA Visual Narrative Departments at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

Co-hosted by Village Preservation and the Village Alliance.

 

Coloring Pages to Print

Click to enlarge and print. Illustrations by Robert Van Nutt.

 

Virtual Backgrounds for Your Next Zoom Meeting

(Click to enlarge and download)